Lisa Randall: Should science inform politics?

Physicist
A little scientific method couldn't hurt.
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TRANSCRIPT

Lisa Randall: Certainly science . . . I think that’s another important issue, which of course I should be focusing on more. I mean science has not been incorporated more in policy, even when it’s quite relevant. I mean scientific advice has been ignored for the last few years to a large extent. That’s crazy. I mean you know why not . . . You have the . . . you have the expertise there. Why not use it? So when . . . when it’s appropriate, of course science should be used. The scientific method should be used sometimes. Sometimes it’s just a question of really being logical about things, and . . . But sometimes it really is a question of scientific policy when, of course, scientists should be consulted. I think certainly math and science are important; but the problem is if you don’t have teachers who understand science, you’re never gonna do a good job of teaching science. So perhaps there should just be some way that it’s made a better career so that people who really understand science are more inclined to teach it. If you have the wrong people teaching science, it will probably do more harm than good. You really need the right people doing it. Recorded On: 11/2/08