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The Six Dimensions of Time - by Robert F. Schuyler

August 17, 2012, 12:00 AM
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Editor's note: This is an overview by Robert F. Schuyler of his book TIME, available from Rosedog Press. 

I believe that this presentation is not just theory; it is fact.  We live in a world, a galaxy, and a universe of six dimensions.  The physics used today do not reflect the last two dimensions and are thus limited in theory, especially where and when different fields are involved.  With six dimensional theory, all the divisions between fields close up and their interrelations are exposed.  Basically time, of it, is three-dimensional.  The basic configuration of these dimensions would have the arrow of time moving forward as successive planes of time rotate around it in sub atomic circles.  In the atom, time moves from the nucleus (residing infinitesimally in the past) out through the electron (residing slightly in the future) and outward.  Electrical charges on particles identify their position on the time axis, and, of course, their energy levels.  Atoms do not appear as a nucleus surrounded by a grouping of electrons extending beyond the nucleus in a burst of orbits.  In reality atoms would appear as the pictures of electrostatic force tracing as generated in the lab by IBM in Stuttgart, Germany, as tiny spheres.  Electrons exist in shells, as per the periodic table, embedded in their time planes in successive layers.  The periodic table with its isotopes is generated in four layers at most with the neutrons on the outermost layer.

Neutrons exist as extremely close-coupled proton/electron pairs in the outer layer of the nucleus.  Outside the atom, they are spactiotemporally aligned having their protons facing the past in the temporal spiral, and their electrons facing the future.  Within the atom, neutrons are aligned oppositely in their time planes.  The electrons in the neutron layer face the proton core and the protons in the neutron layer facing the surrounding electrons.  The polarity of the neutrons locks them in this position.   The neutron time planes, being interwoven are under tension until the neutron is liberated from the atom into empty space.  Neutrons under tension gain mass; neutrons under compression lose mass like any other particle.  Only particles embedded in time planes have mass because mass is caused by slippage within time planes moving in sub-atomic circles driven by the movement of time planes.  Their mass is proportionate to their cross-section temporally, and to their volume on a multidimensional scale.  Massless particles such as photons are tiny tornadoes between time planes moving like balance wheels pulling their planes together in the winding and letting them spring back in the loosening.  The rotary motion of these planes is compromised at loci where particles penetrate said planes and join the angular momentum of one plan to the other (or others) compromising energy levels.  Pulling and pumping the energy levels produces local changes in the angular momentum and produces corresponding magnetic fluctuation via the marshmallow effect.  Hence a magnetic ripple is produced as each little tornado moves away as the time planes separate.  As the time planes pump electrostatic energy is produced between planes, which makes the electromagnetic energy signature.  Thus light acts as both a massless particle and an electromagnetic wave.  The book goes deeper into this issue so that many seeming conundrums and contradictions will disappear in a better light. In the book, I explain other types of electromagnetic radiation as well.  (Please read the preface in the book on pages VII-VIII. as well as the chapter synopses on pages V-VI).

Of interest is the question:  “What is mass?” and “why is it evidenced mostly in changes in speed?”  Mass is an effect of a particle or particles moving in and through time.  When a particle is driven in a temporal spiral by the time planes, and is synchronized with the warp of space, no energy changes or is exchanged.  However, when a particle moves out of synchronism with its driving time planes it acquires mass (like a pearl dropped in oil) through viscosity.  Basically, like oil around a pearl, the path of the time stream is longer when it flows over the surface than elsewhere.  A non-frictional retarding or impelling force is produces, in respect to the time planes to either accelerate or decelerate the particle.  The equations developed from these considerations become the standard physics equations we are all familiar with.

Also, when we review gravity as the distortion in the temporal field surrounding mass, our analysis resembles the “rubber sheet” equivalent where the elastic time planes imitate “rubber sheets.”  (I did not calculate the effect of light and other energy).  I use mass as previously defined in my calculations.  However, the calculations are based on geometry of particles to produce standard equations.

We can only see that part of the past that is locked in with matter.  When the matter of the past becomes today’s matter, the pasty becomes devoid of it in situ.  The matter may have moved forward in time or moved elsewhere in space—or perhaps even exploded.  When matter moves forward in space-time, it cannot occupy any place in the past for that would require energy of great magnitude sufficient to replace itself and move through time itself.  Such a maneuver would require the energy of galaxies.  Einstein’s formulae would require infinite power and energy to make such a movement.  However nature is more flexible and would make compensatory adjustments to minimize energy loss.  Also we can only see a limited portion of the future.

 

About the Author: Robert F. Schuyler, P.E. is the author of TIME. He is a former deputy director with the Electrical Department of New York City Transit. In 1991 he retired from that position and entered private practice as a consulting engineer.

 

 

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