The folks at Harvard Business Review do good work writing about best practices with regard to day-to-day operations. Rebecca Knight's recent article on conducting job interviews is no exception. She acknowledges the obvious goal of vetting potential candidates and disqualifying those who don't fit. She also notes how imperative it is that interviewers take time to sell the position to the good candidates. Especially now that the recession is on its way out, qualified job-seekers won't hesitate to jump ship if they're not comfortable. In this regard, you are both a candidate assessor and a workplace salesperson.

Knight addresses several categories of thought to keep in mind. These include preparing strong questions, takings steps to reduce stress for both parties, involving an interview co-pilot, considering cultural fit, and designing a results-based form of assessment. She also decries the use of outdated or silly tactics such as the dreaded "what are your biggest weaknesses?" type questions.

Check out the full article (linked below) and let us know what you think.

Read more at Harvard Business Review

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