Tom Glocer
CEO, Thomson Reuters
02:58

Why the CEO of Thomson Reuters, Tom Glocer Blogs

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Tom Glocer wanted to see what blogging is all about. So, he blogs!

Tom Glocer

Tom Glocer is chief executive officer of Thomson Reuters, a leading global source of intelligent information for businesses and decision makers in the financial, legal, tax and accounting, scientific, healthcare and media markets.

Glocer joined Reuters Group in 1993 as vice president and deputy counsel of Reuters America and has held a number of senior leadership positions at Reuters, including President of Reuters LatAm and Reuters America, before being named CEO of Reuters Group PLC in July 2001.

Glocer is on the board of Merck & Co., Inc., and serves as a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the International Business Council of the World Economic Forum, the International Advisory Board of British American Business Inc., and various other corporate and philanthropic organizations. Glocer holds a bachelor's degree in political science from Columbia University and a J.D. from Yale Law School. You can read his blog at www.tomglocer.com.

Transcript

Tom Glocer: To totally recursive about it, I just wrote a couple of blogs about why I blogged. I did it initially because I just wanted to feel what it was like.

I’ve always had this belief--and this is what I wrote the first of the two blogs on--that there are really two ways to learn things. One is in a more sort of school-like atmosphere which is somebody with more information, imparts that information to you, whether in a classroom or via a book, or if you’re a grownup in the business world you go out and you hire McKinsey and they write you a 100-page beautiful report on the social phenomenon and economic model of blogging and social media. You read it, you underline a bit, you think you paid too much, but for that moment you sort of feel like you get it, but you don’t really know the contours because you’ve just essentially read somebody else’s work. You’re not able to integrate that into your worldview.

The other way of doing it, and it’s so simple, I couldn’t go out and wouldn’t want to go out and build a nuclear bomb, but it isn’t that hard to go out to any one of the various sites and create your own blog, and do it, and interact with people, and see what people are interested in, and how do you post comments, and how do you review them, and how do you incorporate that into your next work. So I just started doing it to learn by doing. Then along the way I discovered I liked it.

I was going to do it in a different way than, let’s say traditional, if one could even say there’s such a thing as traditional blogging, so young in its life. But most bloggers who are professional bloggers are doing it almost with Twitter repeatedly, multiple posts a day, because they are trying to drive traffic and people are supposed to come look at it, and obviously if you only post once every couple of weeks, you’re not going to have much to monetize advertising agains. But I’m not doing it for that purpose. I only write when there’s an intersection of A) When I have the time, and B) When I feel I have something to say. And I don’t feel I have something to say more than once or twice a month, so that’s how I evolved into the current position.

 

Recorded on: May 29 2009.

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