The Proof We Needed To Prevent War

The standard of proof had been laid out clearly in the decades since the destructive lie of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. And then George W. Bush claimed there were so-called "weapons of mass destruction" in Iraq, siting fake evidence.
  • Transcript


David Remnick: I think the media has a share of responsibility for not getting at the nub of the most difficult question of all, in the beginning of the war, and that’s weapons of mass destruction. No one, save some pieces in Knight Ridder and a few other places, cast sufficient doubt of that crucial issue to halt that freight train that was the [George W.] Bush administration. And it was an ideological freight train.

I don’t think opinion journalism was going to halt that freight train of the [George W.] Bush administration. I think the only thing that could possibly, conceivably have derailed it is if somehow investigative reporting had discovered that the entire WMD thing was a sham. And it was a sham, and a historical sham.

And no one in a way sufficient and large enough, despite some excellent efforts, including Knight Ridder, clearly did that. 

I think clearly there’s been more self-laceration and self-examination in the journalistic world than in the White House.