Re: What is the root of Islamic fundamentalism?

Meridor supposes that it may be because Muslim societies are struggling to make it in the world and the internal conflict in these societies is being exported to the rest of the world.
  • Transcript


Sallai Meridor: Well it’s very difficult to say that there is one point in time or one particular reason.  We do see the trend.  It’s a challenge to try and analyze and try to look for the roots.  We only . . . Our eyes can only show us the symptoms.  I think that one of the contributors to that may be a growing level of frustration in Muslim societies of their inability to make it in the world, and that their systems are not allowing the value which there is there in their societies to reach, speak and contribute to them, and to contribute to world societies.  So one thing is where they are, vis-a-vie
. . . vis-a-vie a fast-advancing western society.  At the same time, I assume that there are internal intentions within these societies between different segments of societies and others . . . between elements and societies of the regimes of those societies.  So in a way, I’d say there are internal conflicts that are being exported to us, unfortunately.  And these internal conflicts are enhanced by maybe a sense of frustration of not being able to cope in a competition for ideas, for new technology, and for progress.