What is Big Think?  

We are Big Idea Hunters…

We live in a time of information abundance, which far too many of us see as information overload. With the sum total of human knowledge, past and present, at our fingertips, we’re faced with a crisis of attention: which ideas should we engage with, and why? Big Think is an evolving roadmap to the best thinking on the planet — the ideas that can help you think flexibly and act decisively in a multivariate world.

A word about Big Ideas and Themes — The architecture of Big Think

Big ideas are lenses for envisioning the future. Every article and video on bigthink.com and on our learning platforms is based on an emerging “big idea” that is significant, widely relevant, and actionable. We’re sifting the noise for the questions and insights that have the power to change all of our lives, for decades to come. For example, reverse-engineering is a big idea in that the concept is increasingly useful across multiple disciplines, from education to nanotechnology.

Themes are the seven broad umbrellas under which we organize the hundreds of big ideas that populate Big Think. They include New World Order, Earth and Beyond, 21st Century Living, Going Mental, Extreme Biology, Power and Influence, and Inventing the Future.

Big Think Features:

12,000+ Expert Videos

1

Browse videos featuring experts across a wide range of disciplines, from personal health to business leadership to neuroscience.

Watch videos

World Renowned Bloggers

2

Big Think’s contributors offer expert analysis of the big ideas behind the news.

Go to blogs

Big Think Edge

3

Big Think’s Edge learning platform for career mentorship and professional development provides engaging and actionable courses delivered by the people who are shaping our future.

Find out more
Close
With rendition switcher

Transcript

Pau; Cruickshank: Well I think the . . .  Hmm, yeah.  Those are two different things, so I mean . . .  Britain had a real problem in the 1990s because it basically allowed a number of radical clerics, especially four very key clerics to operate within the country.  … was one of them; another; …another.  And these clerics were allowed to operate; to give sermons; to radicalize youngsters; to travel up and down the country; address thousands of followers.  And some of those followers then joined up with Al Qaeda, became involved with suicide bombings, and caused real problems for the British authorities in the period afterwards.  And certainly by either expelling some of them or imprisoning others of them, that problem has been reduced.  The radicals now have been driven much more underground into the United Kingdom, which poses all sorts of other concerns.  But at least there isn’t this radical message being put out in the open anymore in the UK.  And so that has changed the climate to a degree in the United Kingdom, and you’re starting really to see a pushback against the radicals amongst all sorts of constituencies in the Muslim community.  People who once had some sympathy with (01:00:57) some of Al Qaeda’s goals in the very least are now going around mosques and they’re saying, “Don’t be any part of this.  This ideology is not Islamic.”  So you’re seeing people who were once involved with some of these movements now turning against them, and a sort of push back happening against the radicals.  And the key was the July 7, 2005 Al Qaeda attack on the London subway system which really woke up a lot of the Muslim community in Britain to the threat of Al Qaeda; and turned some people who had at least a little bit of sympathy with what some of what Al Qaeda was doing around the world, and certainly Iraq and Afghanistan, away from the organization.  It was the sort of polarizing event.  It really turned the vast majority of Muslims fully against Al Qaeda and the country.  But of course of the people who were already radicalized, some of them became even more fervently radicalized by that event . . . energized by that event.  Certainly the four suicide bombers amongst the small radical fringe are seen as heroes.  I’ve had people come up to me and say, “…is a blessed martyr.”  You know, “He’s gonna go to paradise.”  They see him as an example.  Some of them unfortunately might want to follow in his footsteps.  But for the vast majority of Muslims, and even for some Muslims who have some sympathy for some of Al Qaeda’s goals, that was an event that made them wake up and turn against the radicals.  So July 7th was very important in London in really starting off an opposition against this ideology and changing the climate.

 

Recorded on: Jan 14 2008

 

 

Prosecuting Radicals withou...

Newsletter: Share: