Ted Kennedy, 1932-2009
Late U.S. Senator (D) Massachusetts
02:10

Is the American political system broken?

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Kennedy reminds us that we can't take democracy for granted.

Ted Kennedy, 1932-2009

Senator Edward M. Kennedy represented Massachusetts in the United States Senate for forty-six years. He was elected in 1962 to finish the final two years of the Senate term of his brother, Senator John F. Kennedy, who was elected President in 1960.  Ted Kennedy was re-elected to seven full terms.

Throughout his career, Kennedy fought for issues that benefited the citizens of Massachusetts and the nation. His primary focus was making quality health care accessible and affordable to every American, but he was also active in education reform and immigration reform, raising the minimum wage, defending the rights of workers and their families, strengthening civil rights, assisting individuals with disabilities, fighting for cleaner water and cleaner air, and protecting and strengthening Social Security and Medicare.

Kennedy died after a long battle with brain cancer on  August 25, 2009.  He was 77. 

Transcript

Ted Kennedy: I’m basically a hopeful and optimistic person. In many respects, as long as Americans are going to be involved and engaged, I don’t think it [the US political system] will be broken.

I think when it is really kind of threatened is when Americans lose interest, lose involvement, lose engagement. And it does seem to me this particular year [i.e. 2007]– as we’re coming into the presidential year [i.e. 2008] – the energy, and the liveliness, and the enthusiasm – particularly on our side, the Democratic side and the Democratic candidates – is very alive, and very involved. The polls reflect it, but all you have to do is see the turnouts of people that are turning out and involved and engaged. And I think that’s the most positive indicator in terms of the strength of our democracy. I think that that’s something that we have to gauge.

I don’t want to extend this answer too long, but I remember very well when finally democracy came to South Africa, and there was a person that had been waiting in line, and a journalist inquired and said, “How long have you been waiting in line? And now you’re going to vote.” And he said, “I’ve been waiting in line for 78 hours.” Seventy-eight hours standing and waiting in line.

And then the journalist said, “Well how old are you?” And he says, “I’m 78 years old, and I’m going to stay in line until I can vote.”

We too frequently take the right to vote, and take our responsibilities – and I think it’s the responsibilities of leadership, of citizenship – we take them too much for granted. We’re in for the ride and not for the work, and that I think is something we have to be reminded of.

 

Recorded on: September 14, 2007


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