Thomas A. Stewart
Executive Director, NCMM AND Former Chief Marketing & Knowledge Officer, Booz & Company
01:34

How has New York changed?

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Tom Stewart talks about the slow change of New York City.

Thomas A. Stewart

Thomas A. Stewart is the Chief Marketing and Knowledge Officer (CMKO) of the global management consulting firm Booz & Company. Stewart most recently served as editor and managing director of Harvard Business Review, and is a best-selling author, an authority on intellectual capital and knowledge management, and an influential thought leader on global management issues and ideas.

During Stewart’s six years with Harvard Business Review, the magazine was a two-time finalist for general excellence in the National Magazine Awards, and received an “Eddie” in 2007 from Folio Magazine.

Previously, Stewart served as the editorial director for Business 2.0 and as a member of Fortune’s Board of Editors. He is the author of two books, Intellectual Capital: The New Wealth of Organizations, and The Wealth of Knowledge: Intellectual Capital and the 21st Century Organization, published by Doubleday Business in 1998 and 2003, respectively.

Stewart is a fellow of the World Economic Forum. He is a summa cum laude graduate of Harvard College, and holds an honorary Doctor of Science degree from Cass School of Business at City University, London.

Transcript

Question: How has New York City changed?

Tom Stewart: Social progress happens sort of the way teenagers’ acne clears up … slowly.  It takes so much than you ever think it’s going to.  Or the way a warm front, you know … rain stops.  It sort of gradually tapers off.  And when you think about that in this city …  New York City, when I first came here in1970, was a city that was pessimistic and it seemed to be getting worse.  And that now is this amazing city and the safest big city in America, and just so exciting, and was able to sustain, you know, the horrific shock of …  You couldn’t … I mean, you couldn’t have imagined a September 11, 2001 happening 20 years before.  It would have been just the … the final metaphor of the collapse.  Instead it was the final proof of the revival.  So I think recognition of these things take time, and that the solutions need to … sort of a rebirth of pragmatism.  Let’s get the best that we can and then get a little better, and then get a little better, and get a little better and not let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

Recorded on: 6/22/07

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