Carol Greider
Molecular Biologist, Johns Hopkins University
01:07

From One Nobelist to Another: Greider on Obama

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With President Obama having been awarded the Nobel Prize, biologist Carol Greider, a fellow 2009 laureate who waited 25 years to see her work honored, discusses whether he deserved to win so soon.

Carol Greider

Carol W. Greider is the Daniel Nathans Professor & Director of Molecular Biology & Genetics at Johns Hopkins University. Her research on telomerase (an enzyme she helped discover) and telomere function won her a 2009 Nobel Prize in Medicine. Prior to joining the Johns Hopkins faculty, she obtained a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1997, and was a faculty member at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a recipient of the 1998 Gairdner Foundation International Award.

Transcript

Question: What was your opinion of President Obama’s Nobel win? 

Carol Greider: Oh, I was very excited when I heard that he had won the Nobel Peace Prize, and I really saw it as a promise of something for the future. And he's been such a supporter of science, and science in the public eye, that I really felt like that was a very good thing. And I do see it as a hope for the future for the direction that he is going in terms of world peace.

Question: Can science promote peace?

Carol Greider: Science can promote an understanding between people at a really fundamental level. So yes, I think that science can promote peace by bringing people together to work on problems and to realize that there are problems that everybody faces that can be best approached by people working together in different directions.

Recorded November 10th, 2009
Interviewed by Austin Allen

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