Gary Wadler
World Anti-Doping Agency; NYU School of Medicine
02:22

Dr. Gary Wadler on the Floyd Landis Case

To embed this video, copy this code:

Landis challenged his case. What did that reveal about the testing process?

Gary Wadler

Gary I. Wadler, M.D., FACP, FACSM, FACPM, FCP, is an internist with special expertise in the field of drug use in sports.  He is the lead author of the internationally acclaimed textbook, Drugs and the Athlete.  Dr. Wadler currently serves as the Chairman of the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) Prohibited List and Methods Sub-Committee and serves as an ex-officio member of WADA’s Health, Medicine, and Research Committee. Additionally, he has served as a Medical Advisor to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, a Trustee of the Board of the American College of Sports Medicine and of the Women’s Sports Foundation. Among his other sports medicine activities, he has served as Tournament Physician of the U.S. Open Tennis Championships.

For his groundbreaking work in the field of drug abuse in sports, Dr Wadler received the International Olympic Committee's President's Prize in 1993. He is a frequent lecturer on the subject and his opinions are widely sought by the print and electronic media nationally and internationally. In 2007, he was selected by the Institute for International Sport as “One of the 100 Most Influential Sports Educators in America” and serves Chairman of the Communications and Information Committee of the American College of Sports Medicine. In addition, he is Chairman of the American Ballet Theatre's Medical Advisory Board where he oversees the development of medical guidelines for the healthy and sound training of dancers in the United States.  Dr. Wadler is the Chairman of the College Council of the State University of New York at Old Westbury. Dr. Wadler maintains a private practice in Internal Medicine and Sports Medicine in Manhasset, New York and is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at the NYU School of Medicine.

Transcript

Question: Have you gotten any cases wrong?

Gary Wadler: The one case that everybody has tended to speculate about, and people have watched the process in operation, has been the Floyd Landers case, the cyclist, where the two different approaches for detecting testosterone abuse suggested that an abuse occurred. These two tests are totally different approaches. Both came up with the same result. He’s challenged that. And actually the challenges work up the chain of command, if you will, and went to the United States Anti-Doping Agency and the tribunal that looked at that particular case of experts concluded that there was a doping violation. And I believe he’s taking this to the Court of Arbitration for Sport which is the last stop. But it was an interesting experience because people watched how complicated this all is. And that’s probably the bottom line of what I want to say here is how complicated and sophisticated this all is. This is not just taking a pill. The science is very demanding; the adjudication process is very demanding. There’s a lot at stake here. And the only way it seems to me this was able to be dealt with is to institutionalize the whole process and that’s really how WADA was born. Whether it’s the laboratories, the collection of specimens, the handing out of sanctions, developing the list, the concept of therapeutic use exemptions, which we should talk about, there are so many different elements to this that sound bite critiques of doping really don’t do justice to the evolution of the anti-doping movement over the last eight or nine years.

Recorded on: 04/25/2008


×