Periods, miscarriage, and menopause: Why is animalistic womanhood taboo?

Staff Writer at The New Yorker
January 31, 2018
In 2013, Ariel Levy published her critically acclaimed essay Thanksgiving in Mongolia in The New Yorker, recounting the experience of giving birth to her baby at five months, alone in a hotel room in Mongolia, and ultimately losing him. "For ten minutes I was somebody's mother," she says. That feeling was impossible to come to terms with when she returned home, and the culture of silence surrounding miscarriage rocked her. "I felt like: why doesn't anybody talk about this? This is an incredibly intense experience that a lot of women have. And when it happens to you there's no literature about it, there's very little, so you feel insane." For Levy, this taboo extends to the entire animal experience of being a woman: menstruation, fertility, childbirth, child loss, menopause—all things to be whispered, not discussed. Listening to Levy make this broad experience of loss deeply personal and public is incredibly moving. Ariel Levy's memoir The Rules Do Not Apply, is out now.