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We are Big Idea Hunters…

We live in a time of information abundance, which far too many of us see as information overload. With the sum total of human knowledge, past and present, at our fingertips, we’re faced with a crisis of attention: which ideas should we engage with, and why? Big Think is an evolving roadmap to the best thinking on the planet — the ideas that can help you think flexibly and act decisively in a multivariate world.

A word about Big Ideas and Themes — The architecture of Big Think

Big ideas are lenses for envisioning the future. Every article and video on bigthink.com and on our learning platforms is based on an emerging “big idea” that is significant, widely relevant, and actionable. We’re sifting the noise for the questions and insights that have the power to change all of our lives, for decades to come. For example, reverse-engineering is a big idea in that the concept is increasingly useful across multiple disciplines, from education to nanotechnology.

Themes are the seven broad umbrellas under which we organize the hundreds of big ideas that populate Big Think. They include New World Order, Earth and Beyond, 21st Century Living, Going Mental, Extreme Biology, Power and Influence, and Inventing the Future.

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Big Think’s contributors offer expert analysis of the big ideas behind the news.

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Use Your Mind to Overcome Anger and Anxiety

December 30, 2012, 2:10 PM
Anxiety

What's the Latest Development?

While we can't avoid the events that will upset us in life, we can change how we deal with them, say psychologists. Based on experimental data, Ohio State researchers recommend taking concrete steps to help yourself feel better about an unfortunate event. One technique known as self-distancing can help you to cope by "mentally moving away from the situation and watching it at a distance, as if it had happened to someone else." In an experiment where subjects were purposefully frustrated by experimenters, those who practiced self-distancing responded with less aggression as the experiment progressed. 

What's the Big Idea?

Another pitfall when it comes to recalling traumatic events is doing so abstractly. In an experiment, subjects in one group wrote about trauma in a concrete, objective way, by concentrating on questions such as "How do I feel right now? How did I feel at the time of the event and what did I see, hear and think? How might I deal with a similar situation in the future?" After the writing exercise, the concrete-thinking group reported fewer intrusive memories of the event than the abstract-thinking group, which asked questions such as "Why didn't I handle it differently?"

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com


 

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