Testing, testing: How will measurement change in the future of education?

When measuring for the future, there is much to consider.

Testing, testing: How will measurement change in the future of education?
  • We need to embrace a plethora of schooling options as necessary to help different types of learners get to success.
  • On top of testing for literacy and math competence, we should also test for other things that are clearly important to parents, such as whether kids feel safe and cared for. These things are softer but more difficult to assess.
  • To improve our education system, we need to understand we currently only have answers to some huge open questions right now. We are still figuring things out on how to enrich different people's lives as they find their positions in the economy — and society at large.
  • This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform.
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Gear
  • 12min summarizes hundreds of best-selling books down to essential 12-minute microbooks.
  • Microbooks are downloadable in both text and audio formats.
  • You can request a 12min summary of any non-fiction book not in their vast library.
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How can we best help students? Cultivate their love for learning.

So much has changed since 1893. Why not the education system?

  • In 1893, a committee of ten leaders in education chaired by Charles Eliot, the president of Harvard University, produced a report that aimed to unify the various education systems and philosophies across America, with the goal of giving the same education to everyone.
  • That framework is still operating in the U.S. today—but should it be? John Hardin, vice president of Stand Together Ventures, points out that this uniform approach does not take into account the unique interests and skills of each kid. It might even squash children's love of learning, rather than cultivating it.
  • This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform.
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Redefining the “experts” in education reform might be the key to success

Can we radically shift our perception of who should be enacting real change in K-12 education?

Redefining the “experts” in education reform might be the key to success
  • The right kind of education reform will happen with people instead of to people.
  • Part of this requires redefining who the "experts" are in education. It might be beneficial to loosen control on the part of those that train principals and teachers.
  • If educators can view themselves as hosts to the conversation of what schools could look like, the movement for change becomes more courageous.
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How can the music industry inform the system of K-12 education?

The history of the music industry parallels that of many industries and institutions in the U.S. Many, that is, except for education.

How can the music industry inform the system of K-12 education?
Sponsored by yes. every kid.
  • The history of the music industry has been one of bundling and un-bundling: Originally, the only place you could hear your favorite song was on the radio, if you were lucky. But then you could buy a single on a 45. Then, individual songs became bundled again on LPs. Then, you could buy them un-bundled through mp3s.
  • This process of bundling and un-bundling has taken place in many industries and institutions over time. The result is greater choice, more personalization, and a better experience.
  • But this hasn't really happened in education. Instead, education has been delivered in a one-size-fits all bundle that's not really relevant for every student. How can we fix this?
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How does stress affect a child’s development and academic potential?

Understanding cognitive development and stress in children can add context to systems of education.

How does stress affect a child’s development and academic potential?
Sponsored by yes. every kid.
  • The majority of growth of the human brain happens after birth.
  • While unrelenting stress can damage developing structures of the limbic system, calibrated challenge can positively stimulate brain growth. Teachers have an important role in assuring students of their safety when taking on new challenges.
  • This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform.
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How can cognitive science inform the future of education?

The science of learning is decades ahead of the education system. How can we bring education into the present?

How can cognitive science inform the future of education?
Sponsored by yes. every kid.
  • The education field has a wealth of cognitive science research that reveals how people learn, yet the applied practice happening is schools shows an enormous disconnect.
  • Things like school bells, siloed 'one-hour-one-subject' classes, traditional grades, and standardized testing are outdated design features of the education system.
  • Equitably educating all learners across diverse populations to help them be as successful as possible will require education innovators to put cognitive science to work in the field, and to re-educate policymakers on what school could look like.
  • This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform.
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