Why Are Spanish Fingerprints on Latin American Constitutions?

Latin America's leftward shift of recent years has been consecrated on paper with the help of a shadowy group of Spanish constitutional law scholars who have accepted large sums of money to advise the rewriting of many countries' constitutions.

Exhibit one is Ecuador, where advisers to assembly leader Alberto Acosta accepted $120,000 to suggest language for the country's 444-article constitution. Ecuadorinmediato reported Spaniards counseled the Ecuadorian government on hot-button issues like gay marriage. The Spaniards maintain that they has no part in the actual drafting of documents, but soveriegnty expert Kintto Lucas--a Uruguayan who has lived in Ecuador for many years--complained they "truly didn't know the country." Similar stories emerge from Venezuela and Bolivia.


What are the ethics involved in appealing to foreign advisers--from a former colonizing nation no less--on Latin American nations' central legal documents? Debate and discuss on Big Think.

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