Why are Americans no longer interested in space exploration?

Most Americans who were of age when we landed on the moon can tell you exactly where they were at that historic moment. During the Mercury and Apollo missions, America was glued to the television, and television coverage was extensive. Today, we care more about what Britney Spears is doing, than what NASA is up to. The media almost never reports on NASA happenings. And, when Bush announced the plan to go to Mars, it wasn’t well received. The space race bestowed upon us a wealth of technology that we now us everyday; and, unlit lately, mankind has always been driven by exploration. What gives?

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Videos
  • Oumuamua, a quarter-mile long asteroid tumbling through space, is Hawaiian for "scout", or "the first of many".
  • It was given this name because it came from another solar system.
  • Some claimed Oumuamua was an alien technology, but there's no actual evidence for that.

Scientists create a "lifelike" material that has metabolism and can self-reproduce

An innovation may lead to lifelike evolving machines.

Shogo Hamada/Cornell University
Surprising Science
  • Scientists at Cornell University devise a material with 3 key traits of life.
  • The goal for the researchers is not to create life but lifelike machines.
  • The researchers were able to program metabolism into the material's DNA.
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7 fascinating UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Here are 7 often-overlooked World Heritage Sites, each with its own history.

Photo by Raunaq Patel on Unsplash
Culture & Religion
  • UNESCO World Heritage Sites are locations of high value to humanity, either for their cultural, historical, or natural significance.
  • Some are even designated as World Heritage Sites because humans don't go there at all, while others have felt the effects of too much human influence.
  • These 7 UNESCO World Heritage Sites each represent an overlooked or at-risk facet of humanity's collective cultural heritage.
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