Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

Telepathy Is Easier Than You Think

Michio Kaku: Personally, I think that there are easier ways of telepathy than using quantum entanglement.  Already we can take MRI scans, EEG scans of the brain, decipher them using computers, shoot that information to another person.  This is called radio-enhanced telepathy.  

Using quantum entanglement to do that is quite complicated because of the problem of de-coherence.  Objects that vibrate in phase when you separate them are also coherent.  There’s an umbilical cord that emerges between two objects.  That’s called quantum entanglement.  However, we consist of trillions upon trillions of atoms, so to get two minds to vibrate in unison like that would be impossible.  The world’s record for making objects entangled is only just a few atoms.  Imagine trying to entangle two minds together. 

So it sounds like a neat idea, putting quantum entanglement with telepathy, but hey, let’s be real: there is an easier way to do it, and that’s using computers and radio.

Directed / Produced by
Jonathan Fowler & Elizabeth Rodd

Some have proposed using quantum entanglement (the invisible umbilical cord that exists between objects) as a form of telepathy. But there are much more practical ways of achieving telepathy that already exist.

Can VR help us understand layers of oppression?

Researchers are using technology to make visual the complex concepts of racism, as well as its political and social consequences.

Future of Learning
  • Often thought of first as gaming tech, virtual reality has been increasingly used in research as a tool for mimicking real-life scenarios and experiences in a safe and controlled environment.
  • Focusing on issues of oppression and the ripple affect it has throughout America's political, educational, and social systems, Dr. Courtney D. Cogburn of Columbia University School of Social Work and her team developed a VR experience that gives users the opportunity to "walk a mile" in the shoes of a black man as he faces racism at three stages in his life: as a child, during adolescence, and as an adult.
  • Cogburn says that the goal is to show how these "interwoven oppressions" continue to shape the world beyond our individual experiences. "I think the most important and powerful human superpower is critical consciousness," she says. "And that is the ability to think, be aware and think critically about the world and people around you...it's not so much about the interpersonal 'Do I feel bad, do I like you?'—it's more 'Do I see the world as it is? Am I thinking critically about it and engaging it?'"
Keep reading Show less

Russia claims world's first COVID-19 vaccine but skepticism abounds

President Vladimir Putin announces approval of Russia's coronavirus vaccine but scientists warn it may be unsafe.

Credit: Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP
Coronavirus
  • Vladimir Putin announced on Tuesday that a COVID-19 vaccine has been approved in Russia.
  • Scientists around the world are worried that the vaccine is unsafe and that Russia fast-tracked the vaccine without performing the necessary phase 3 trials.
  • To date, Russia has had nearly 900,000 registered cases of coronavirus.
  • Keep reading Show less

    Swedish scientist advocates eating humans to combat climate change

    A scientist in Sweden makes a controversial presentation at a future of food conference.

    Surprising Science
    • A behavioral scientist from Sweden thinks cannibalism of corpses will become necessary due to effects of climate change.
    • He made the controversial presentation to Swedish TV during a "Future of Food" conference in Stockholm.
    • The scientist acknowledges the many taboos this idea would have to overcome.
    Keep reading Show less

    Therapy app Talkspace mined user data for marketing insights, former employees allege

    A report from the New York Times raises questions over how the teletherapy startup Talkspace handles user data.

    Talkspace.com
    Technology & Innovation
    • In the report, several former employees said that "individual users' anonymized conversations were routinely reviewed and mined for insights."
    • Talkspace denied using user data for marketing purposes, though it acknowledged that it looks at client transcripts to improve its services.
    • It's still unclear whether teletherapy is as effective as traditional therapy.
    Keep reading Show less
    Quantcast