Telepathy Is Easier Than You Think

Michio Kaku: Personally, I think that there are easier ways of telepathy than using quantum entanglement.  Already we can take MRI scans, EEG scans of the brain, decipher them using computers, shoot that information to another person.  This is called radio-enhanced telepathy.  

Using quantum entanglement to do that is quite complicated because of the problem of de-coherence.  Objects that vibrate in phase when you separate them are also coherent.  There’s an umbilical cord that emerges between two objects.  That’s called quantum entanglement.  However, we consist of trillions upon trillions of atoms, so to get two minds to vibrate in unison like that would be impossible.  The world’s record for making objects entangled is only just a few atoms.  Imagine trying to entangle two minds together. 

So it sounds like a neat idea, putting quantum entanglement with telepathy, but hey, let’s be real: there is an easier way to do it, and that’s using computers and radio.

Directed / Produced by
Jonathan Fowler & Elizabeth Rodd

Some have proposed using quantum entanglement (the invisible umbilical cord that exists between objects) as a form of telepathy. But there are much more practical ways of achieving telepathy that already exist.

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