Youth brain: How does your office view aging?

Getting older — see: looking older — is not ideal in the workplace culture of youthfulness.

DAVE ASPREY: A lot of people think that taking care of your skin or just wanting to look good is about either sexual attractiveness, or it's about ego. But it turns out it's sometimes those things, but quite often, it's something different. It has to do with wanting to be able to take care of your family. Because people who look healthy, they get paid more. This is just how it works, and there's abundant evidence to do that.

And I've seen this in Silicon Valley. We know, throughout all of, at least, North America, that the length of time -- this is actually studied -- that a woman is considered to be with executive presence is lower than it is for men. Because somehow, guys can have wrinkles and gray hair, and we look distinguished. But for some reason, that's not the case with women. That's not cool. And it turns out -- here's a dirty secret -- it's not that different. In Silicon Valley, guys over 45, do you know what they start doing? They start dying their hair because it turns out that there is a culture of youthfulness. And if you want to play in that game, whether you're a man or a woman, taking care of the way you look is important. It turns out also that, if you do it not with artificial makeup and stuff like that, but you do it with the things that make you healthy, guess what else happens. You don't just look healthy, you actually can live longer.

So how do you make your skin look better from the inside out? One of the biggest things is regularly using grass-fed collagen protein. The studies that are out there that look at how quickly mammals replace collagen in their tissues show that it takes seven years to replace half the collagen that's in your body. That means, I'm on probably year 11 of eating collagen on a regular basis. I think I'm doing pretty well for my age. I do a lot of other stuff too. But if you do this regularly, you see a difference.

There are other things that are in Super Human, like red light therapy. You couldn't do red light therapy 10 years ago, because they didn't make red LEDs that were strong enough. It turns out there's narrow frequencies of light that cause a thickening of your skin that reduce fine lines.

So we're in this world where we can send a signal from the environment around us into our skin and into our hair to make them thicker and healthier, where we can eat things that cause our body to be able to make healthier cells, healthier skin. And when you do that and you avoid the things that cause inflammation, magic can happen.

So these are things that, when you do it for your hair or your skin, all the other organs in your body that you can't see are also going to benefit. And end of the day, you are not only going to look younger at work, your brain is going to work better at work. And if you want executive presence, whether you're a man or woman, say something smart. And if you are 70 years old and doing that, and people don't even know that you're 70, because they think you're 50, because you have amazing energy, but you have the wisdom and knowledge of an extra 20 years of experience, you're going to run circles around all the kids around you.

  • Professional biohacker Dave Asprey says the healthier you are, the better you're paid at work. So taking care of yourself doesn't just serve the ego, it can also provide for your family.
  • This can differ between men and women, however, as the latter face age discrimination more heavily.
  • Taking measures to benefit the health of your mind and body can get you ahead in the workplace culture of youthfulness.


Super Human: The Bulletproof Plan to Age Backward and Maybe Even Live Forever


Are passwords obsolete? Thoughts from a famous fraudster.

In the next two to three years we'll see passwords go away in a way that's long overdue.

Videos
  • When we look at online breaches, about 86 percent of the time the hacks have to do with passwords. Because of this, many security experts believe we need to move away from using them.
  • Consequently, we've now developed the technology to do just that. For instance, we now have a technology called Trusona — it stands for "true persona." The technology recognizes the individual, more accurately, based on their device.
  • Many industries are already switching to this method of identity verification. Airlines are already switching, banks are switching, universities, too, are switching.
Keep reading Show less

Yale scientists restore cellular function in 32 dead pig brains

Researchers hope the technology will further our understanding of the brain, but lawmakers may not be ready for the ethical challenges.

Still from John Stephenson's 1999 rendition of Animal Farm.
Surprising Science
  • Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine successfully restored some functions to pig brains that had been dead for hours.
  • They hope the technology will advance our understanding of the brain, potentially developing new treatments for debilitating diseases and disorders.
  • The research raises many ethical questions and puts to the test our current understanding of death.
Keep reading Show less

Heart attacks and canker sores: why we need to take oral health seriously

Your microbiome begins in your mouth. Why don't we look there more often?

Photo by Carl D. Walsh/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images
Surprising Science
  • Eighty percent of patients who've had heart attacks have gum disease, says Dr. Shahrzad Fattahi.
  • Oral health is also implicated in forms of cancer, dementia, canker sores, and more.
  • Fattahi says the future of medicine must also focus on saliva, as a whole new field of salivary diagnostics is emerging.
Keep reading Show less