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What makes for an excellent human life?

Practical philosopher Andrew Taggart talks about what is an excellent human life, what are the first steps to achieving it and what a society without work looks like.

Are there limits to the truths science can discover?

Dr. Alex Berezow talks about the importance of communicating science in a clear and accurate way and why he turns to religion for the answers to some questions.

Chemicals used to make non-stick pans linked to rapid weight gain

These chemicals are also widely used in products like clothing, shoes, wrappers and furniture, to make them more stain-resistant, waterproof and/or nonstick.

How did Valentine's Day become so commercial—and is it a bad thing?

From striking women with goat’s skin to showering them with chocolates and flowers, here is how Valentine’s Day became the holiday we know today. 


 

Researchers say we have a 'narcissism epidemic'. So what's causing it?

Are you an important person? The answer you give may indicate to psychologists how narcissistic you are. Similarly, the culture you are born into plays an important role.

 

Why do we buy roses on Valentine's Day?

Amongst other reasons, because they don't mind planes.

Major report warns that a "meat tax" is coming

After tobacco, carbon, and sugar, meat may be next on the list to be taxed by governments in their efforts to comply with health and environmental policies. 

This solar power plant in Nevada could finally wean humanity off of fossil fuels

An hour away from Area 51 in the Nevada desert, this solar power plant "banks" energy in a way that could be replicated across the world. 

Scientists explain 'love at first sight'

Every third American reports that he or she has experienced it.

Getting more sleep curbs sugar cravings, study finds

Studies have also shown that two weeks of sleep deprivation increases the consumption of excess calories, particularly from energy-dense, high-carbohydrate snacks. 

You may be using this flying taxi in two years

Bell Helicopter has just premiered its electric, self-piloting air taxi design at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. 

How smart is 'too smart' for a romantic partner?

Is high IQ really something that can genuinely turn people on? Apparently so — but only to a certain point. 

Is sugar good for concentration?

Scientific studies have been inconclusive when it comes to the cognitive effects of sugar. Some suggest that sugar has positive effects on brain function while others disagree.

MIT scientists use nanoparticles to engineer glowing plants

Imagine reading by plant light, and glow-in-the-dark trees instead of street lamps. That's on the horizon thanks to these engineers.

The Hidden Psychological Heritage of the Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution brought along the second agricultural revolution, the unthinkable transformations of entire ecosystems, the collapse of the family and community, and the ethics of consumerism. 

How to maximize the brain benefits of storytime for infants

Not all books are created equal. Especially when it comes to the ones parents read to children to aid their development. A new study from the University of Florida points to an important characteristic to look for in children’s books.

Why highly intelligent people suffer from more mental and physical disorders

Your brain's heightened sensitivity can make you perceptive and creative. But it's a double-edged sword, researchers find.

Being married linked to better cognitive function, researchers say

Research points to many social-cognitive, emotional, behavioral and biological benefits that marriage seems to bestow on its participants.

Everything We Know About Physics in One Neat Infographic

If you've ever wondered which part of physics covers which part of space, fret no more. Here is an awesome map that lays it all out.

Kansas is Rebuilding its Entire Educational System

Kansas has launched such an ambitious educational project that public officials are likening it to the NASA moon missions of the 1960s.

 

Here's What a Country Without Net Neutrality Looks Like

Insert dial-up noise here. If you're not concerned about what's about to happen with net neutrality, you're not paying attention. 

Activists are Using 3D Printing to Save the Rhinos

The idea is to flood the markets and drive prices down. Contrary to what you may think, a rhino horn is not made of bone but of keratin - the material found in nails and hair.

New study finds the egg may actually 'choose' the sperm

Here's the first evidence to challenge the "fastest sperm" narrative.

First FDA-Approved Digital Pill Tracks Schizophrenic Patients

The FDA has approved the first pill with an embedded ingestible sensor that can track when, or if, a patient takes their medication. 

This A.I. Chatbot Will Get Revenge on Email Scammers For You

Bothered by spam and phishing emails? This bot can waste months of a spammer's time, and produces some hilarious results... and you can use it for free right now. 

A Surprising Strategy Makes Kids Persevere at Boring Tasks

Kids say the darndest things. They're also far more adept at workflow management than adults are. What can we learn from them? 

Study finds Montessori education obliterates the difference between high- and low-income kids

Researchers tracked academic achievement, social cognition, executive function, and creativity in a longitudinal study of kids across the socioeconomic spectrum. 

How Growing Up Bilingual Affects Cognitive Development

The positive effect of bilingualism may be particularly beneficial for kids who grow up in low-income households, an environment that usually has negative effects on cognitive performance.

Saudi Arabia Is Building a $500-Billion New Territory Based on Tech and Liberal Values

This independent zone, with its own regulations and social norms, will be built from scratch on 10,231 square miles of untouched land at a cost of $500 billion. 

4 Tips to Help You Make Better, More Ethical Decisions

Adults tend to become lazy with their thinking, backing into moral and ethical wrongdoing without noticing fully what they’re doing. 

Should Teachers Make $100K Salary? California Will Decide

Voters in California may get to decide whether teachers’ salaries should match those of state legislators at the expense of a hike in the sales tax.

Glue Made of Human Protein Heals Wounds Faster and Better

Another bit of science fiction is coming to life as scientists develop a highly elastic and adhesive surgical glue, similar to the one Ryan Gosling used to seal his wound in Blade Runner 2049.

How Tesla and Elon Musk May Begin Rebuilding Puerto Rico's Power Grid

Tesla founder Elon Musk is in talks with the governor of Puerto Rico to help rebuild the island’s power grid using Tesla technologies. 

Earth’s Hidden Continent Zealandia Finally Recognized

After decades of research and analysis of geoscience data, the seventh largest geological continent officially exists.

You probably have the wrong impression about schizophrenia

About 51 million people around the world suffer from schizophrenia, yet half of the general public doesn’t understand what schizophrenia really is

Why We Need Philosophy Camp for Adults

Go back to school, Agora style. Philosophy can train us to respond to life's problems rather than merely react. One such training camp is coming to Baltimore. 

All Roads Paved with Asphalt Trap 90% of the Sun's Heat—That's a Problem

Concrete buildings, asphalt paved roads radiating accumulated heat throughout the night, and lack of trees contribute to the making of scorching cities. 

How Caffeine Tricks Your Taste Buds and Your Brain

Caffeine makes us feel more awake but also decreases our ability to taste sweetness

Letting School Kids Sleep In Could Add Billions to the U.S. Economy

It could add $83 billion to the U.S. economy in 10 years—and that's a very conservative estimate.

What If Your Future Car Was Hooked Up to Your Brain?

What if your car was an extension of yourself? Neuroscience, art, and engineering combine to give us a glimpse of that future.

You Can Now 'Shazam' Plants and Animals with Your Phone

Don't just point and shoot, point and learn! These apps are fun for nature lovers, and contribute to scientific databases of flora and fauna. 

Does LSD Microdosing Boost Intelligence and Creativity? This Study Hopes to Find Out

Imagine getting imperceptibly high, then playing Chinese strategy game 'Go'. This is the experiment the Beckley Foundation will run to test the value of LSD microdosing.

James Franco Has a New Show All About Philosophy

Would you rather learn philosophy from James Franco or a professor of philosophy? Well, now you don't have to choose.

What the early life of Steve Jobs can teach us about success

This infographic, by Anna Vital from Funders and Founders, recaps the significant moments of Steve Jobs’ journey on, and sometimes off, the path of success. 

What the Early Life of Bill Gates Can Teach Us About Success

He created Windows and made billions of dollars. But that wouldn't have happened if it weren't for a few small things in his early life. 

This 25-pound blanket will help you sleep like a rock

Weighted blankets have been proven to help you get a better night's sleep by mimicking swaddling and increasing serotonin levels. 

AI Can See America's Wealth Inequality From Space

Just by looking at satellite images, AI can predict your income bracket, and tell us what wealth and poverty look like from space.

What the Early Life of Elon Musk Can Teach Us About Being Great

Elon Musk is without  doubt one of the great visionaries of our age. But how did he get there? 

The way you draw a circle can reveal a lot about your past

Quartz has analyzed 100,000 drawings to see if there are cultural differences in the way people draw basic shapes.

This Toy Develops STEM Skills and Hands-On Thinking—Especially in Young Girls

Designed by two MIT professors, this build-it-yourself kit teaches kids to "think with their hands" in an effort to bolster STEM skills early on.

Eating Late at Night Could Be More Dangerous Than You Think

First of its kind study compares the effects of eating between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. and eating between noon and 11 p.m.

Why Promoting Human Rights May Not Be the Way To a More Peaceful World

Stephen M. Walt, a professor at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, tackles some seemingly non-controversial statements about human rights, democracy, and international law.

Express Yourself With These Politically Incorrect Crayons

A pair of Kickstarter enthusiasts, want to make coloring even more fun for you by merging Cards Against Humanity with the 'boring' crayon to make it... politically incorrect.

Budapest's Brain Bar Will Gather Top Scientists, Artists and Entrepreneurs

Europe’s best and brightest minds converge upon Budapest to solve the problems of today's Europe. Topics will include AI, the job market, emerging technology, and more. 

Fall Asleep and Wake Up Refreshed On This High-Tech Pillow

If you're constantly tired because you can't break your bad sleeping patterns, this super smart Sunrise Pillow might put you back in the game.

This Skyscraper Would Dispense Apartments Like A Vending Machine

Haseef Rafiei, a young Malaysian architect, had a thought one day: what if we could convert the real estate industry into an automated vending system? 

How to Make Maps and Graphs Colorblind People Can Actually Read

Not everyone sees color the way you do. There are a suite of tools available to help graphic designers work more inclusively. 

Gamers Around the World Will Join Scientists in the Search for a New Earth

Amidst the recent discovery of super-Earth LHS 1140b - one of the "most exciting” exoplanets discovered in the last decade - a unique scientific crowdsourcing project is about to begin to further advance the search for new planets.

Conspiracy theories: Why more educated people don't believe them

What makes some of us more susceptible to conspiracy theories than others? It may have to do with our level of education. 

The Cliché Question That, When Asked, Improves Kids' Well Being

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” is one of those cliché questions that adults ask automatically. It turns out that the answer may reveal a lot about an adolescent’s health.

 

This Awesome LEGO-Compatible Tape Has Raised More than $1.4M on Indiegogo

You know what would make LEGO even better? A base tape that lets you build against gravity.

Man-Made Glaciers May Be Himalayan Farmers' Last Resort

The European Geosciences Union predicts that over 70% of glacier volume in the Everest region could be lost by 2100. One man has engineered a solution so that life in these regions can go on.

This App Collects Data on How Frequently Women Are "Manterrupted"

There's an app that detects manterruptions—but we round up the research to find out which groups of people are really doing the most interrupting.

The first smart watch for blind people lets them receive texts and notifications

This is huge news for the 285 million visually impaired people around the world.

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