Actually, the Customer Is Not Always Right

This will be music to the ears of anyone who's ever worked in customer service. Is this old managerial adage doing companies more harm than good?

Technology & Innovation

The tired, old adage many businesses run by is that "the customer is always right", but Simon Sinek is here to tell us we’ve got it all wrong. All companies must make and increase profits to survive, but what’s missing is the understanding of it as a linear process. Rather than staring at the end goal, it literally pays to see it as a chain effect. When managers put their employees first, employees are empowered to deliver the ideal customer service a top company would strives for. Through an anecdote about one service industry worker who is employed at two differently run establishments, Sinek illuminates how the best managerial method is to prioritize the wellbeing of employees first. Simon Sinek's most recent book is Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action.

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Are You a Visionary – or a Follower? Here's How to Step Up

Visionaries know why they get out of bed each day. Do you? Ethnographer and leadership expert Simon Sinek explains how to find direction and fulfillment in your personal and professional life.

Personal Growth

Do you know why you get out of bed in the morning? According Simon Sinek (ethnographer, leadership expert, and the official mascot for optimism), answering "because I have to" isn’t quite cutting the mustard.

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The Benefits of Being a Leader Are Real. But Are There Costs?

Why did Homo sapiens survive where other animals died off? The answer has to do with evolution.

Personal Growth

Why did we, Homo sapiens, survive into modernity while others died out over time? According to Simon Sinek, author of Start With Why, the answer lies with evolution. Starting with our first tribal collectives, humans evolved acute collaboration and community skills. That sort of organization keeps us alive. But there's a catch...

We Know What You Do, But What Do You Believe?

After I learned my why, I literally stopped telling people what I did and only started telling them what I believed. 

I’ve always been a pretty happy-go-lucky guy.  But about five years ago, I reached a point in my career where my passion was gone.  I stopped loving what I was doing and I even got to the point where I didn’t even like it anymore and for a happy person, just being unhappy was bad enough.  And it was the closest I’ve ever been, if I wasn’t completely depressed, and what was hard is when I would ask people for advice or I’d look for advice, it actually made it worse because everything I would hear was everything I was doing wrong. 

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