Technology & Innovation

Lynda Resnick was only 19 years old when she founded a full-service advertising agency and is now the co-chairman of Roll International, the parent company of such lovable brands as POM Wonderful, Fiji Water and Teleflora. Now she has a new book.

A marketing genius and former owner of Franklin Mint, Resnick introduced “Flowers in a Gift,” which earned her a gold Effie award; she is responsible for the now-ubiquity of pomegranate. For six years, Resnick has been listed as one of Working Woman’s Top 50 U.S. Women Business Owners. Her service on the Executive Board of The Aspen Institute and as a Trustee of Los Angeles County Museum of Art is only a small slice of her overall civic engagement.

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Technology & Innovation

Howard Sosin was the kind of Wall Street dealmaker who flourished in the footloose days of the mid-80s. As the founder of AIG Financial Products, he invented many of the complex financial instruments blamed for changing the rules of risk and wrecking the global economy. Now Sosin says he has a plan to fix America’s banks and restore confidence in the markets. Can a guy who got rich structuring derivatives save the global economy?

The story begins in 1986 (and is documented in full in a Washington Post story from last year called The Beautiful Machine) when Sosin, working with two other partners at the infamous junk-bond firm Drexel Burnham Lambert, conceived of an elaborate scheme to create attractive long-term, derivative-backed deals—theoretically immune to market fluctuations—that could be sold to Wall Street’s top financial institutions. It was a plan well suited for the hyper-deregulatory environment of the 1980s—Sosin realized you didn't have to be a bank to get into the derivative game and that operating under a different structure made the process much more efficient.

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Surprising Science

Nick Bilton, a designer, user interface specialist, technologist, journalist, hardware hacker, who is currently the design integration editor and user interface specialist at The New York Times and The Times Research & Development Lab, has a few things to say about media integration.

Bilton was featured in that cool New York magazine story about tech renegades at the New York Times. He also works as an adjunct professor in the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU where he teaches a course on one-two-ten design interaction. The idea is to tell stories for the one-foot distance between you and your phone, the two-foot distance between you and your computer and the ten-foot distance between you and your television. Here's Nick with a video explanation.

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