How Social Media Profits from Our Moral Emotions

You mad, bro? The way that Facebook (and Twitter) manipulates your brain should be the very thing that outrages us the most.

Technology & Innovation

Social media has been, without a doubt, one of the biggest explosions in connectivity in human history. That's the good part. The bad part is that the minds of the people within these companies have manipulated users into an addictive cycle. You're already familiar with it: post content, receive rewards (likes, comments, etc). But the staggering of the rewards is the habit-forming part, and the reason most moderately heavy social media users check their apps or newsfeeds some 10-to-50 times a day. And to add to the problem — these algorithms have been strengthend to show you more and more outrageous content. It genuinely depletes your ability to be outraged by things in real life (for instance, a sexual predator for a President). Molly Crockett posits that we should all be aware of the dangers of these algorithms... and that we might have to start using them a lot less if we want to have a normal society back.

Why Inequality and Injustice Makes Us—and Our Brain—So Angry

Get mad when you read the news these days? It's more than just what you're reading. When you perceives unfairness or inequality, says Molly Crockett, the brain receives it more-so as an attack on identity.

Mind & Brain

Get mad when you read the news these days? It's more than just what you're reading. When you perceives unfairness or inequality, says Molly Crockett, the brain receives it more-so as an attack on your identity. It's a startling realization that helps explain both Brexit and the rise of Donald Trump—because despite all evidence to the contrary (i.e. that Britain would lose billions and perhaps trillions if they left the E.U. without a plan, and in America, that electing a reality star with a proclivity towards grabbing women's genitals might not be a good thing for anyone at all) much of the western world has voted with their outrage minds rather than with their rational minds. This video is part of a series curated by Tali Sharot, author of the new book The Influential Mind: What the Brain Reveals About Our Power to Change Others.