Technology & Innovation

Want to gain social status? Be certain in your judgments, whether or not you are qualified to make them. Want to rise to the top? Assess yourself to be more skilled than you actually are.  And here’s the kicker: new research suggests that even when your guarantees turn out to be wrong and your bold decisions result in unmitigated disasters, you will still gain respect and influence. I spoke with Matthew Hutson, science writer and author of “The 7 Laws of Magical Thinking: How Irrational Beliefs Keep Us Happy, Healthy, and Sane,” to find out why overconfident people reap elevated social status—and if a blowhard backlash is ever coming.

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“To a single woman, a lifetime of weddings can begin to seem like a nuptial-themed Groundhog Day; we guests behaving slightly differently each time within the same basic framework,” writes Jen Doll in her new memoir Save the Date: The Occasional Mortifications of a Serial Wedding Guest. Doll will be the first to admit that her behavior as a serial wedding goer has fallen under every conceivable category — good, bad and ugly. But through the total sum of these experiences, or “societal, photographic special days” as she calls them, she gained an understanding of the way modern weddings have become a staging area for self-definition.  

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Technology & Innovation

Pitching 1,807 innings against the most feared hitters on the planet, including Ken Griffey Jr., Barry Bonds, and Cal Ripken Jr., is no easy feat. It takes as much mental fortitude as it does physical strength. Former All-Star righty Bob Tewksbury knows this first hand, hurling all those pitches over his 13 years on a major league pitching mound.

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Why 'trying too hard' can sabotage your success

What we can glean from success in the sports world.

Technology & Innovation

In part four of my five-part interview series with Bob Tewksbury, the new director of player development for the Major League Baseball Players Association, as well as retired major league pitcher and former mental skills coach for the Boston Red Sox, he explains why effort is required to succeed, but too much effort can lead to disaster.

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