So You Want Digital Voting? Hackers Want It Even More

Since Russia (most likely) hacked our Presidential election in 2016, there's been talk of using cell phones for voting. Think again.

Technology & Innovation

Since Russia (most likely) hacked our Presidential election in 2016, there's been talk of using cell phones for voting. That's not a good idea, says security expert Kathleen Fisher. Almost all available electronic methods are in some way able to be hacked: either the machine themselves or the program counting the votes at the end. It's quite a vicious conundrum that is leaving leaders in D.C. and Silicon Valley scratching their heads. Is the good ol' paper ballot our best option? It just might be.

How Hackers Can Control Your Car’s Brakes, Doors, and Steering—and Why Car Makers Can't Stop Them

More modern cars are easier to hack. So are pacemakers and other medical devices. What does that mean for the future?

Technology & Innovation

Cars are getting increasingly cooler, with many new bells and whistles like cruise control and hands-free parallel parking added on year by year. But this also means that cars are increasingly reliant on onboard computers which in turn leads to the possibility of hackers finding their way into your car and having it do whatever they want it to. And although it might sound like the plot of a terrible romantic comedy, think about this: could a hacker hack their way into your heart? Possibly, as many newer pacemakers are set to a wifi signal. It's a scary prospect, but one that we have to face.