Neurotic people have noisier, more chaotic minds, say researchers

Study finds that neurotic people deal with more "mental noise" than others.

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Mind & Brain
  • Neuroticism is characterized by emotional instability and lack of resilience.
  • People who score high on neuroticism are at an increased risk for mental health problems and relationship woes.
  • New research suggests that neurotic people deal with more mental noise.
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Why do people with depression like listening to sad music?

Research suggests that people with depression find sad music calming — or even uplifting.

Mind & Brain
  • A 2015 study found that people diagnosed with depression were more inclined to listen to sad music.
  • The researchers believed, then, that this finding meant depressed individuals sought to maintain their low mood.
  • However, a new study, published in the journal Emotion, has flipped that implication on its head: rather than maintain their mood, researchers now say the sad music may be calming to people with depression — even uplifting.
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Psychology’s 10 greatest case studies – digested

These ten characters have all had a huge influence on psychology. Their stories continue to intrigue those interested in personality and identity, nature and nurture, and the links between mind and body.

Portrait of brain-injury survivor Phineas P. Gage (1823–1860), shown holding the tamping iron which injured him. Image source: Wikimedia
Mind & Brain

These ten characters have all had a huge influence on psychology and their stories continue to intrigue each new generation of students. What’s particularly fascinating is that many of their stories continue to evolve – new evidence comes to light, or new technologies are brought to bear, changing how the cases are interpreted and understood. What many of these 10 also have in common is that they speak to some of the perennial debates in psychology, about personality and identity, nature and nurture, and the links between mind and body.

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The 'beautiful mess' effect: other people view our vulnerability more positively than we do

Psychologists have found that, while we tend to judge our own vulnerability more harshly, we perceive vulnerability in others as courage.

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Admitting mistakes, seeking help, apologising first, confessing one’s romantic feelings – all these kind of situations involve intentional expressions of vulnerability, in which we may fear being rejected or being judged negatively, yet we grit our teeth and go ahead anyway. According to a team of psychologists writing in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology contrary to our worst fears, having the courage to show our vulnerability in these ways will often be rewarded. That’s because there is an intriguing mismatch in the way we take a more negative view of our own vulnerability than we do of other people’s – the researchers call this “the beautiful mess effect”.

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