Is Time Travel Possible? Only Since 1895

The idea of time travel, so familiar to us now, was unheard-of before H.G. Wells's 1895 book The Time Machine. Since then, notions of time travel have blossomed in fascinating ways.

Technology & Innovation

The idea of progress — technological and moral — is inescapably familiar to us. For anyone born after the invention of the steam engine in the early 1700s, a steady series of mechanical and social changes (from the train and telegraph to the American and French revolutions) imbued each person with a sense of inexorable advancement. And it is these kinds of changes, James Gleick argues in his new book Time Travel: A History, that gave us the idea that we could literally travel to the future.

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James Gleick: Information Without Meaning

James Gleick ponders the paradox in information theory that since information is based on surprise, it is also chaotic and in many cases devoid of meaning.

Technology & Innovation

James Gleick ponders the paradox in information theory that since information is based on surprise, it is also chaotic and in many cases devoid of meaning.

James Gleick on the Common Character Traits of Geniuses

Today's video is part of a series on female genius, in proud collaboration with 92Y's 7 Days of Genius Festival.

Videos

This video is part of a series on female genius, in proud collaboration with 92Y's 7 Days of Genius Festival.

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How the Internet is Forcing Us to Readjust

Technology makes some conversations seem pointless, boring.

How is the Internet going to force us to readjust?  Certainly in ways that we can't yet guess because these are early days for the Internet and just as certainly in ways that we’re beginning to get a glimmering of. 

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