Does Quantum Nonlocality Violate Einstein's Theory of Relativity?

The ability of particles to coordinate their behavior across distances may seem to violate the speed-of-light constant, but is a signal really being sent between them? Or does Einstein still reign?

Surprising Science

The ability of particles to coordinate their behavior across distances may seem to violate the speed-of-light constant, but is a signal really being sent between them? Or does Einstein still reign?

When Einstein challenged Bohr, a new universe was born

Scientific advancement is more than a series of experiments: it is often a debate among scientists with fundamentally different points of view. Niels Bohr knew this firsthand thanks to Einstein.

Surprising Science

Scientific advancement is more than a series of experiments: it is often a debate among scientists with fundamentally different points of view. Niels Bohr knew this firsthand thanks to Einstein. As science journalist George Musser explains, while Bohr may have tired of Einstein's indefatigable questioning of quantum physics, the two maintained a healthy and competitive relationship throughout their careers. When Bohr came to work at Stanford University alongside Einstein, an intellectual debate began that shaped the future of modern physics.

Multiple Universes Can't Explain Reality — The Idea That Can Is Even Stranger

The positing of universes parallel to ours, to explain the behavior of quantum mechanics, may seem like the weirdest idea ever. But it might be just the second-weirdest idea ever.

Surprising Science

One of the prevailing mysteries of quantum mechanics, the vanguard of the physical sciences, is the phenomenon of "non-locality," i.e., the apparent causal interaction of tiny particles across vast distances of space. The event violates our understanding of causality grounded in Newtonian physics as well as Einstein's conception of a space-time continuum undergirding all of reality. One proposition that gets us out of this conundrum is multiple universes. This solution, however, doesn't explain a number of other observations we've made of the universe, including black holes. Perhaps our understanding of space and time needs reconsidering, but where does our knowledge of the universe stand after that?

Spooky Action 101: Is Space as We Know It a Kind of Illusion?

The physics of "nonlocality" made easy.

Culture & Religion

Among Albert Einstein's most compelling theories is the idea of "spukhafte Fernwirkung," also known as spooky action at a distance. In this video, science writer George Musser gives a crash course in Einstein's fascinating model, which seeks to explain how objects separated by great distance can still seem to be in sync.

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