Rethinking the Cost of Pollution

A business throws out pollution but doesn’t have to account for it or pay for it.

Making what the planet needs profitable for individual businesses has worked when we’ve tried it.  It’s worked on fish where we’ve given fishermen an incentive to be stewards of the fishery.  Suddenly they become advocates for a lower catch limits.  If they have a share in that catch in the future they become advocates for strict enforcement even for marine-protected areas around the spawning grounds of fish.

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How to Incentivize Sustainability

The Environmental Defense Fund developed a market-based proposal to reduce the omissions of sulfur dioxide, the cause of acid rain. 

The first President Bush had promised the American people in his campaign to be elected that he would solve the acid rain problem.  And so when he got in to office I was invited to the White House by his counsel C. Boyden Gray and we talked about many subjects. But one thing that the Environmental Defense Fund was encouraged to work on was be a market-based proposal to reduce the omissions of sulfur dioxide, the cause of acid rain.  Here’s how it worked.

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A Healthy Planet is a Profitable One

Through policy we can make capitalism work for the things that we need to survive as people on this fragile planet that we share.

What the planet needs is profitable for individual businesses. This way of thinking has been tried and it has worked. It has worked for fish, where we’ve given fishermen an incentive to be stewards of the fishery.  Suddenly they become advocates for lower catch limits.  If they have a share in that catch, in the future they become advocates for strict enforcement even for marine-protected areas around the spawning grounds of fish.

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Videos

Will the natural gas boom revitalize the U.S. economy and provide us energy for 100 years? Fred Krupp, President of the Environmental Defense Fund, weighs in.