My Museum 'Aha Moment'

Bryan Sykes on how he became enthralled with nature and natural history. 

My mother used to take me and my brother along to the grand museums at least once every holiday and I loved them, particularly the Natural History Museum.  Everyone loves those dinosaurs.  So that is how I started off. 

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The Human Genome is like a Beethoven Symphony

An orchestral symphony has a lot of instruments, but you tend to concentrate on the soloists. 

An orchestral symphony has a lot of instruments, but you tend to concentrate on the soloists. 

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Genes are the Hand You've Been Dealt. But It's How You Play the Hand That Counts

Our genome sequence does not determine everything that is going to happen to us throughout the rest of our lives.

There are two lines of DNA that are very important and will remain so -- the ones going down your maternal line and your paternal line, and they are very informative.  But they only cover a very small part of your genome.  We now know a little bit more about how to analyze the other parts of your genome, your other chromosomes.  It doesn't help quite so much.  Because your genes are shuffled, you’ve got to do a lot of genealogy work to try and work out which bits come from which ancestor.  

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In Brian Sykes's 2004 book Adam’s Curse: A Future Without Men, he described how male fertility could be decline to the point where men will no longer be able to reproduce naturally. In our recent interview with Dr. Sykes, we asked him what kinds of interventions he would endorse to save the Y chromosome.

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