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We May Be Living Inside a Black Hole

 

 

Physicists agree that 13-15 billion years ago our universe was created by a Big Bang. But where did that Big Bang come from? A new theory posited by a group of physicists presents the possibility that our universe is nestled inside a black hole. We may have a mother universe that is one of many universes, and black holes may be the passageways between them, as reported by National Geographic.

Dr. Nikodem Poplawski of the University of New Haven is one such physicist supporting this yet unprovable theory, according to The Mother Nature Network. Black holes are commonly thought to be "death traps" with gravity that works like a high-powered vacuum from which nothing, including light, can escape. They are believed to be at the center of every galaxy, including our Milky Way. Once these black holes reach the limit of their singularity, according to Dr. Poplawski, and can no longer withstand the weight, of say, billions of suns, it leads to a big bang.

From The Mother Nature Network:


"According to Dr. Poplawski, the reason for such a limit (and, consequently, the universe-creating explosion that follows) is that black holes spin. They spin at near-light speeds. This, in turn, creates a huge amount of torsion. Thus, such massive black holes are not just incredibly tiny and immensely heavy, they are also twisted and compressed. The multitude of forces at work are so intense that a bursting point is eventually reached. This, Poplawski proposes, is how the Big Bang happened, though he prefers to call it 'the big bounce.'"
Dr. Michio Kaku has written here on Big Think about why he believes the name "Big Bang" does not adequately describe the birth of our universe, and argues that string theory could best explain what created it: 

"First of all, the Big Bang wasn't very big. Second of all, there was no bang. Third, Big Bang Theory doesn't tell you what banged, when it banged, how it banged.  It just said it did bang.  So the Big Bang theory in some sense is a total misnomer.

We need a theory that goes before the Big Bang, and that's String Theory.  String Theory says that perhaps two universes collided to create our universe, or maybe our universe is butted from another universe leaving an umbilical cord."

This latest black hole argument to explain the Big Bang is yet another one in support of the multiverse theory, which was once considered "the crazy aunt of quantum theory."



 

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