The Global Ethos: Need, Speed, and Greed

In 2005, Thomas Friedman elegantly pieced together the global frontier for readers in The World is Flat. A book that will go down in history as one that was right on the money, Friedman delineated the interconnectedness of our new world; an environment dramatically shaped by cutting-edge technology and innovation. No longer were countries disparate unions. Rather, Earth had evolved a global brain, in which events that occur somewhere have ramifications everywhere. This was highlighted in the Great Recession, and has proved that though countries may be unique in their cultures and governments, the basic components of prosperity revolve around one’s success in trade, specialization, and collaboration-sparking innovation.

Fast-forward 7 years to 2012. The world is flat, sure, but what’s next?

A cosmopolitan by training, Vijay Vaitheeswaran is the global correspondent at The Economist and his new book Need, Speed, and Greed highlights some of the mega trends that will shape the coming decades. In his vision of our future, innovation will reign ubiquitously if and only if we can create the environments and incentives for innovators to flourish.

The book highlights several areas where this is already the case. Platforms like Innocentive and The X Prize Foundation have created opportunities for innovators to compete on solving problems through reward-based participation, essentially acting to “turbocharge the thinking process” on a wide-spread and scalable level.

Mr. Vaitheeswaran explains that we need to embrace this notion of “greed for good” to help solve our world’s grand challenges.  He believes we are entering an age where exponentially-increasing technology and the coinciding innovation will take the developing world out of poverty and spark a new era where prosperity is a global commodity.

To reach this point, however, Vaitheeswaran explains we must embrace “the new rules of global innovation”, which include accepting failure as part of the process, exercising resilience, and making proper investments in education and infrastructure.  He uses the analogy of a rising tide, which lifts all the boats except those with holes in them. By addressing the bastion upon which countries’ prosperity can be built from, we can enter this next stage of planetary prosperity and bring everyone along for the ride. It is an optimistic perspective for sure, but the tools and resources are widely available to push these ideas into reality.


LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

Can the keto diet help treat depression? Here’s what the science says so far

A growing body of research shows promising signs that the keto diet might be able to improve mental health.

Public Domain
Mind & Brain
  • The keto diet is known to be an effective tool for weight loss, however its effects on mental health remain largely unclear.
  • Recent studies suggests that the keto diet might be an effective tool for treating depression, and clearing up so-called "brain fog," though scientists caution more research is necessary before it can be recommended as a treatment.
  • Any experiments with the keto diet are best done in conjunction with a doctor, considering some people face problems when transitioning to the low-carb diet.
Keep reading Show less

Steven Pinker's 13 rules for writing better

The Harvard psychologist loves reading authors' rules for writing. Here are his own.

NEW YORK, NY - JULY 21: Steven Pinker speaks onstage during OZY Fest 2018 at Rumsey Playfield, Central Park on July 21, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Brad Barket/Getty Images for Ozy Media)
Personal Growth
  • Steven Pinker is many things: linguist, psychologist, optimist, Harvard professor, and author.
  • When it comes to writing, he's a student and a teacher.
  • Here's are his 13 rules for writing better, more simply, and more clearly.
Keep reading Show less

Want to age gracefully? A new study says live meaningfully

Thinking your life is worthwhile is correlated with a variety of positive outcomes.

YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images
Surprising Science
  • A new study finds that adults who feel their lives are meaningful have better health and life outcomes.
  • Adults who felt their lives were worthwhile tended to be more social and had healthier habits.
  • The findings could be used to help improve the health of older adults.
Keep reading Show less