Santorum Rising in Iowa. Who is this Guy? Watch the Big Think Interview

With less than a week to go before the Iowa Caucus, it looks like former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum finally has some momentum. According to the latest CNN poll, Santorum has moved up to third place behind Mitt Romney and Ron Paul, with the backing of 16 percent of likely voters. This may not seem very significant, but evangelical voters -- a powerful force in the Republican Caucus -- have until now been fairly evenly split between Santorum, Michele Bachmann and Texas Governor Rick Perry. Momentum, which is derived from a candidate's standing in the polls as well as speculation as to where a candidate's campaign might be headed, is a big factor for voters, who want to pick a winner.


So far, Santorum has set expectations for his performance in Iowa about as low as they could possibly be. The candidate has said he will drop out of the race if he finishes last. And yet, if evangelicals sense they have a winner in Santorum, he could steal support away from Bachmann and Perry, and present a formidable challenge to Romney and Paul, who both have topped out at around 25 percent of the vote in polls. A united evangelical electorate, on the other hand, could deliver 35 percent to Santorum.

If the CNN poll is to be believed, Santorum is peaking late, but at exactly the right time. If you haven't been paying much attention, there's very little time to scrutinize this candidate. The video below is Santorum's interview with Big Think after the last election cycle, in which the former Senator reflected on the "breakdown of trust" in the free market.  

Watch the video here:

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Follow Daniel Honan on Twitter @Daniel Honan

Related Articles

Why the world needs death to prosper

Scientists have developed new ways of understanding how the biological forces of death drive important life processes.

Surprising Science
  • Researchers have found new ways on how decomposing plants and animals contribute to the life cycle.
  • After a freak mass herd death of 300 reindeer, scientists were able to study a wide range of the decomposition processes.
  • Promoting the necrobiome research will open up new areas of inquiry and even commerce.
Keep reading Show less

Why birds fly south for the winter—and more about bird migration

What do we see from watching birds move across the country?

E. Fleischer
Surprising Science
  • A total of eight billion birds migrate across the U.S. in the fall.
  • The birds who migrate to the tropics fair better than the birds who winter in the U.S.
  • Conservationists can arguably use these numbers to encourage the development of better habitats in the U.S., especially if temperatures begin to vary in the south.
Keep reading Show less

How does alcohol affect your brain?

Explore how alcohol affects your brain, from the first sip at the bar to life-long drinking habits.

(Photo by Angie Garrett/Wikimedia Commons)
Mind & Brain
  • Alcohol is the world's most popular drug and has been a part of human culture for at least 9,000 years.
  • Alcohol's effects on the brain range from temporarily limiting mental activity to sustained brain damage, depending on levels consumed and frequency of use.
  • Understanding how alcohol affects your brain can help you determine what drinking habits are best for you.
Keep reading Show less