Bill Nye to Climate Change Deniers: You Can’t Ignore Facts Forever

Bill Nye to Climate Change Deniers: You Can’t Ignore Facts Forever

Is the age of climate change deniers over? Let’s hope so. Because we’ve got serious work to do. If we no longer need to debate whether the Earth is flat, then we no longer need to entertain the possibility that man is not making an unsustainable impact on the planet. From the plastic seas swirling in the oceans to our depleting rainforests to killer storms, the evidence that we’re abusing the Earth can go on and on. At this rate, future generations will hate us, if they ever get the chance.


Luckily, the BBC took a stand against climate change deniers: reporters and producers were told to stop giving airtime to people wanting to spew lies against proven climate science. Bill Nye, a scientist and educator who stands up to the climate change deniers' war on facts, welcomes the BBC’s commitment to report responsibly. In the below interview clip with Big Think, Nye discusses his famous debate with climate change denier Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee who raised around $200,000 from the oil and gas industry in her campaign for re-election.

Nye explains why the rest of media must follow the BBC’s lead on banning deniers and instead focus on solutions to climate change:

It's not that the world hasn't had more carbon dioxide, it's not the world hasn't been warmer.  The problem is the speed at which things are changing.  We are inducing a sixth mass extinction event kind of by accident and we don't want to be the extinctee, if I may coin this noun.  So, I mean as far as Miss Blackburn, sounded like she had been coached on denial bullet points or talking points.  And I very much enjoy taking those people on, but meanwhile it breaks my heart because we got work to do.  And the fossil fuel industry has really gotten in their ears and it's really troublesome.  We're the world's most technically advanced country, or if the U.S. isn't the most technically advanced it's certainly in the top ten.  I mean you could say Japan, New Zealand are very sophisticated societies.  But the U.S. is where iPhone's are invented, what have you, the Internet; it's still a significant place. And so to have a generation of science students being brought up without awareness of climate change is just a formula for disaster. 

For more on Nye’s discussion on why we must put facts before politics and special interest groups and instead focus on diffusing the ticking time bomb humans created, watch this clip from Big Think's interview:

How New York's largest hospital system is predicting COVID-19 spikes

Northwell Health is using insights from website traffic to forecast COVID-19 hospitalizations two weeks in the future.

Credit: Getty Images
Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • The machine-learning algorithm works by analyzing the online behavior of visitors to the Northwell Health website and comparing that data to future COVID-19 hospitalizations.
  • The tool, which uses anonymized data, has so far predicted hospitalizations with an accuracy rate of 80 percent.
  • Machine-learning tools are helping health-care professionals worldwide better constrain and treat COVID-19.
Keep reading Show less

Designer uses AI to bring 54 Roman emperors to life

It's hard to stop looking back and forth between these faces and the busts they came from.

Meet Emperors Augustus, left, and Maximinus Thrax, right

Credit: Daniel Voshart
Technology & Innovation
  • A quarantine project gone wild produces the possibly realistic faces of ancient Roman rulers.
  • A designer worked with a machine learning app to produce the images.
  • It's impossible to know if they're accurate, but they sure look plausible.
Keep reading Show less

Dark matter axions possibly found near Magnificent 7 neutron stars

A new study proposes mysterious axions may be found in X-rays coming from a cluster of neutron stars.

A rendering of the XMM-Newton (X-ray multi-mirror mission) space telescope.

Credit: D. Ducros; ESA/XMM-Newton, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Surprising Science
  • A study led by Berkeley Lab suggests axions may be present near neutron stars known as the Magnificent Seven.
  • The axions, theorized fundamental particles, could be found in the high-energy X-rays emitted from the stars.
  • Axions have yet to be observed directly and may be responsible for the elusive dark matter.
  • Keep reading Show less

    Put on a happy face? “Deep acting” associated with improved work life

    New research suggests you can't fake your emotional state to improve your work life — you have to feel it.

    Credit: Columbia Pictures
    Personal Growth
  • Deep acting is the work strategy of regulating your emotions to match a desired state.
  • New research suggests that deep acting reduces fatigue, improves trust, and advances goal progress over other regulation strategies.
  • Further research suggests learning to attune our emotions for deep acting is a beneficial work-life strategy.
  • Keep reading Show less
    Surprising Science

    World's oldest work of art found in a hidden Indonesian valley

    Archaeologists discover a cave painting of a wild pig that is now the world's oldest dated work of representational art.

    Scroll down to load more…
    Quantcast