Think Again Podcast ep. 35 – THE RIGHT TO BE WRONG (feat. Critic A.O. Scott)

Smart people. Surprise topics. Deep fun. This week, NY Times Chief Film Critic A.O. Scott


 

A.O. Scott: The fantasy that I would use to comfort myself [as a child, about death] was… that I’d become other people. I would still be me, but I would inhabit different bodies…and eventually I would just get to see what it was like to be everybody.

Jason Gots: That’s a critic’s fantasy!

A.O. Scott: Yeah! And you discover shortcuts to do that...through works of art.

A.O. Scott's new book Better Living Through Criticism playfully and artfully examines what critics do and why. On this week's episode, he and host Jason Gots dig into these ideas, then react to surprise clips from Jesse Ventura, MIT professor Sherry Turkle, and philosopher John Grey.

LISTEN TO: Think Again Podcast ep. 35 – THE RIGHT TO BE WRONG (feat. Critic A.O. Scott) 

EXTRA BONUS THING! 

Hear the podcast's shiny new theme song by the MARVELOUS Breakmaster Cylinder IN ITS ENTIRETY. 

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    About Think Again - A Big Think Podcast: If you've got 10 minutes with Einstein, what do you talk about? Black holes? Time travel? Why not gambling? The Art of War? Contemporary parenting? Some of the best conversations happen when we're pushed outside of our comfort zones. Each week on Think Again, we surprise smart people you've probably heard of with handpicked gems from Big Think's interview archives on every imaginable subject. These conversations could, and do, go just about anywhere.


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