Ruth Reichl – IDENTITY CRISIS/THE COOKING CURE – Think Again Podcast, ep. 19

   


 

If you lost everything, what would you reach for first? 

This week on Big Think's podcast, food critic Ruth Reichl, author of My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life talks with host Jason Gots about cooking, identity, and her year-long journey back to herself. 

Listen to THINK AGAIN, EPISODE 19 – IDENTITY CRISIS/THE COOKING CURE (feat. Ruth Reichl)

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    About Think Again - A Big Think Podcast: If you've got 10 minutes with Einstein, what do you talk about? Black holes? Time travel? Why not gambling? The Art of War? Contemporary parenting? Some of the best conversations happen when we're pushed outside of our comfort zones. Each week on Think Again, we surprise smart people you've probably heard of with handpicked gems from Big Think's interview archives on every imaginable subject. These conversations could, and do, go just about anywhere.


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