EGO/FOCUS/XENOPHOBIA (feat. George Takei) - Think Again Podcast, ep. 12

Is attention an endangered species? How do you collaborate with people who hate you? This week on Big Think's podcast, we're joined by actor, activist, and internet superhero George Takei


   

I have an ego. I do, indeed. And I’m asserting myself. But I also understand that I came from all these forces and I’m going to go back to being part of that larger whole. I’m a part of that fish I had for dinner last night. –George Takei

Is attention an endangered species? How do you collaborate with someone who hates you? Is xenophobia a natural side effect of religion? 

In this week's episode of Big Think's Think Again podcasthost Jason Gots is joined by actor, activist, and internet superhero George Takei

Interview clips from Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Ben Parr, and Daniel Kahneman launch a lively conversation about religion, human rights, and the three kinds of attention. 

Listen to THINK AGAIN, EPISODE 12 – EGO/FOCUS/XENOPHOBIA (feat. George Takei)

Other ways to listen

  • RSS Link (for use in podcasting apps such as  PodcastStitcherOvercast and Instacast): http://simplecast.fm/podcasts/1201/rss
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  • Follow us on Twitter: @bigthinkagain
  • HELP! I have no idea what a podcast is or how to get one.

    [with extra special thanks to SERIAL podcast for these excellent instructions]

    Think of a podcast as a radio show you can get on the internet, so you can listen any time you want.  You have two options: you can listen through a website (this is called streaming). Or, you can download a podcast, which means you're saving it on your phone, or tablet, or computer, and you can listen to it anytime, even without an internet connection.

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    Have fun!

    --

    About Think Again - A Big Think Podcast: If you've got 10 minutes with Einstein, what do you talk about? Black holes? Time travel? Why not gambling? The Art of War? Contemporary parenting? Some of the best conversations happen when we're pushed outside of our comfort zones. Each week on Think Again, we surprise smart people you've probably heard of with handpicked gems from Big Think's interview archives on every imaginable subject. These conversations could, and do, go just about anywhere.


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