The Great Throwdini Teaches the Physics of Knife Throwing

Today marks the first time anyone has ever brought an axe to an interview here at Big Think! The Reverend Dr. David Adamovich, a.k.a. The Great Throwdini, just stopped by our office, toting a steel suitcase full of axes and knives.

"Throw," as he likes to be called, is the world's fastest and most accurate knife thrower, as well as the holder of 25 world records. He told us about how he learned, at the age of 50, that he had a natural talent for throwing knives, which he has done professionally ever since. Throw explained to us what it takes to be a knife thrower and told us at what point he had the confidence to first use a live target. He talked about what would compel someone to volunteer as his assistant and have deadly weapons thrown at her—and he described the horrific accident that almost ruined his career.

He also gave a brief tutorial about everything you'll need to know to start throwing knives yourself. Don't try this at home, kids!


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