Pity the Macho Man

Tough guys don't cry. But during what's been called the "he-cession," they have plenty of reason to. As writer/journalist Reihan Salam explained to Big Think in an interview today, not only have traditionally "manly" jobs such as construction been disproportionately affected by the downturn, but the largely male politicians and executives responsible for the crisis are beginning to see their dominance eroded as well.

Worse yet for alpha-dudes, Salam believes (as he wrote in an essay, "The Death of Macho," earlier this year) that the trend will prove to be permanent. As historically happens when large numbers of men lose work, an uptick of crime, domestic violence, and other societal ills may lie ahead...unless men can learn some of the skills women have traditionally offered.


Salam's interview will be posted as part of our upcoming series, "The Problem With Men."

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