Friday Feedback: Suggest a Big Think Guest!

Earlier today, Big Think reader Tricia Adams forwarded us an article highlighting "33 Interesting and Inspiring Academics Worth Following on Twitter," which she thought might be of interest to you, our readers. You can check out the list, which includes numerous former Big Think guests, here. Big Think is dedicated to sharing the thoughts and ideas of experts and influencers and we always appreciate your suggestions. 


In the spirit of fostering a more open and ongoing dialogue about our prospective guests, we will now be accepting your submissions each and every Friday. Of course, we cannot promise that any of your requests will be met, but we will surely do our best to incorporate your suggestions into our booking efforts. To suggest a guest, please list them in the comment section below. Be sure to include a few words about why you feel the guest merits a Big Think interview and what you think we should discuss with the person during their guest appearance. 

Thank you to Tricia Adams and thank you for all of your feedback!

Study: 50% of people pursuing science careers in academia will drop out after 5 years

That's a sharp increase from the 1960s when it took the same share of scientists an average of 35 years to drop out of academia.

Pixabay
Surprising Science
  • The study tracked the careers of more than 100,000 scientists over 50 years.
  • The results showed career lifespans are shrinking, and fewer scientists are getting credited as the lead author on scientific papers.
  • Scientists are still pursuing careers in the private sector, however there are key differences between research conducted in academia and industry.
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Why being busy is a modern sickness

We have to practice doing nothing more often.

Photo: Shutterstock
Personal Growth
  • Constantly being busy is neurologically taxing and emotionally draining.
  • In his new book, Jon Kabat-Zinn writes that you're doing a disservice to others by always being busy.
  • Busyness is often an excuse for the discomfort of being alone with your own thoughts.
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New ‘microneedle patch’ could help heart attack patients regrow tissue

The bold technique involves surgically implanting a so-called microneedle patch directly onto the heart.

Red human heart against a yellow background (Getty Images)
Surprising Science
  • Heart attacks leave scar tissue on the heart, which can reduce the organ's ability to pump blood throughout the body.
  • The microneedle patch aims to deliver therapeutic cells directly to the damaged tissue.
  • It hasn't been tested on humans yet, but the method has shown promising signs in research on animals.
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