Listen To "Party At The NSA", A Fun New Song Protesting Surveillance

A new song captures the feelings of the anti-surveillance movement.

Comedian and, apparently, guitarist Marc Maron has teamed up with the band YACHT to make the fun yet serious protest song, "Party at the NSA".


The song, which is thankfully not a parody of Miley Cyrus's "Party in the USA", features an upbeat tone and bitter lyrics criticizing the widespread domestic surveillance being done by the NSA's PRISM program, among others.

The band released a statement along with the song:

"We live much of our lives online; we should be outraged by the extent of the NSA's domestic spying programs. Instead, we are sinking into a dangerous indifference. Insidious forces are at work. Help us reverse the entropy. The Electronic Frontier Foundation is a donation-supported nonprofit that fights back against the government to protect our digital rights; 100% of your donation to download "Party at the NSA" will go straight to fund their important work."

You can listen to the song below, or download it here.

If you can't listen to it, here are the lyrics:

Did you read my mail again?
How do you find the time?
I lost my signal yesterday,
But it was never mine.

We don’t need no privacy.
What do you want that for?
Don’t you think it’ll spoil our fun
If you let that whistle blow?

P-P-P-Party at the NSA,
Twenty, twenty, twenty-four hours a day!

There is a rainbow at the end of every P-R-I-S-M.

Be careful where you look today,
Careful what you share.
We’re gonna make history.
But it won’t know we’re there.

The world looks stranger when you look
Through electronic eyes.
There’s a place in the Beehive State
Where the network goes to die.

P-P-P-Party at the NSA,
Twenty, twenty, twenty-four hours a day!

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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