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Technology & Innovation

The Multi-Locality Life

A growing number of Europeans enjoy parallel lives, such as living in Prague and working in Paris. Known as “multiple habitats,” the phenomenon has piqued sociologists’ interest.

A growing number of Europeans enjoy parallel lives, such as living in Prague and working in Paris. Known as “multiple habitats,” the phenomenon has piqued sociologists’ interest. Living in two places at once has a cost – in time, money and energy. With the planet becoming a smaller and smaller global village, opting for this life style is becoming easier. This issue raises questions over the consequences for the city in which people live only part-time. If people have no fixed home, they are not included in budget calculations even if they use the infrastructure, and they will be disinclined to make a financial contribution.


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