Tesla introduces new Model 3 at $45,000

The new version's battery has a shorter range and a price $4,000 lower than the previous starting price.

  • Tesla's new version of the Model 3 costs $45,000 and can travel 260 miles on one charge.
  • The Model 3 is the best-selling luxury car in the U.S.
  • Tesla still has yet to introduce a fully self-driving car, even though it once offered the capability as an option to be installed at a future date.

Tesla is now offering a cheaper version of its Model 3 sedan at a starting price of $45,000.

CEO Elon Musk announced the new version in a tweet on Thursday.

The Model 3 has been Tesla's lowest priced car since hitting the market in July 2017. As the best-selling luxury car in the U.S., the Model 3 had a starting price of $49,000 when it came with rear-wheel drive, though this version will soon become unavailable.

The new version of the Model 3 features rear-wheel drive and a 'mid-range' battery that can take drivers up to 260 miles on one charge, which is shorter than the 310-mile range of the 'long-range' battery. In the next three to six months, Tesla hopes to offer customers a standard battery model with a 200-mile range and a long-promised starting price of $35,000.

Dwindling tax credits for customers

Customers hoping to score a tax credit when buying the new Model 3 will likely be disappointed.

Tesla recently announced that only orders placed by Oct. 15 would be eligible for the $7,500 that used to accompany each sale. That's because federal law only allowed for the full tax credits until Tesla hit 200,000 sales, after which begins an 18-month phase-out process. The tax credits are scheduled to drop to $3,750 starting Jan. 1, to $1,875 on July 1, and then disappearing altogether by the end of 2019.

Full self-driving autopilot

In addition to offering the new mid-range Model 3, Tesla also recently removed the "full self-driving" option from its orders page. This capability isn't currently available in any model—customers were previously able to pay extra for the feature to be installed at a future date—though Tesla cars do have driver-assist capabilities.

"Please note that Self-Driving functionality is dependent upon extensive software validation and regulatory approval, which may vary widely by jurisdiction," reads the Tesla website.

Musk tweeted that this controversial option was "causing too much confusion."

The removal comes just days after Musk announced that a major upgrade to Tesla's Autopilot system will be available in about six months. (Autopilot is the system that uses cameras, sensors and GPS to automatically control Tesla vehicles.) The upcoming hardware update, which could bring a 500 to 2,000-percent increase in operations per second, will be free only to customers who chose to pay for the (somewhat deceptively named) "full self-driving" option at the time of purchase.

These customers will also be among the first to receive the full-driving capability when it does become available, though that almost certainly won't happen within six months.

5 of the worst inventions in modern history

Be glad your name isn't attached to any of these bad ideas.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Technology & Innovation
  • Some inventions can be celebrated during their time, but are proven to be devastating in the long run.
  • The inventions doesn't have to be physical. Complex mathematical creations that create money for Wall Street can do as much damage, in theory, as a gas that destroys the ozone layer.
  • Inventors can even see their creations be used for purposes far different than they had intended.
Keep reading Show less

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Is Incomplete — There’s a Final, Forgotten Stage

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is incomplete as we commonly know it. Later in his life, Maslow wrote about a stage beyond self-actualization. Nichol Bradford explains how to arrive at this final place.

popular

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs has served as the foundation for understanding human motivation since it was first published in 1943 as part of "A Theory of Human Motivation" in Psychological Review. The hierarchy, visualized in pyramid form, is often given as an introduction to human psychology and still holds weight in population conversation about what humans need from life, and in what order they need it.

Keep reading Show less

Increased air travel may decrease the chances of a global pandemic

The closer together we get, the argument goes, the healthier we'll be.

Surprising Science
  • The more exposed we are to each other, the less surprising a pathogen will be to our bodies.
  • Terrorism, high blood pressure, and staffing issues threaten to derail progress.
  • Pursuing global health has to be an active choice.
Keep reading Show less

Why a federal judge ordered White House to restore Jim Acosta's press badge

A federal judge ruled that the Trump administration likely violated the reporter's Fifth Amendment rights when it stripped his press credentials earlier this month.

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 16: CNN chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta (R) returns to the White House with CNN Washington bureau chief Sam Feist after Federal judge Timothy J. Kelly ordered the White House to reinstate his press pass November 16, 2018 in Washington, DC. CNN has filed a lawsuit against the White House after Acosta's press pass was revoked after a dispute involving a news conference last week. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Acosta will be allowed to return to the White House on Friday.
  • The judge described the ruling as narrow, and didn't rule one way or the other on violations of the First Amendment.
  • The case is still open, and the administration may choose to appeal the ruling.
Keep reading Show less