Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

Androids that offer "digital immortality" begin mass production in Russia

A company claims to make the world's first humanoid android and offers 'digital immortality".

Promobot
  • Promobot, a Russian company, makes the world's first humanoid android.
  • The model Robo-C robot can't walk but has a sophisticated personality AI.
  • The android can be made to look like any human.


We are well on our way to the sci-fi staple of a world inhabited by both people and androids. A startup from Russia is launching mass production of robotic clones of humans.

"Promobot" is offering autonomous service androids that can be made to look like anyone on Earth. The company says their creations are "robot companions," while its Robo-C android is the first of its kind, not only looking like a human but being useful in "business processes".

Aleksei Luzhakov, Promobot's Chairman of the Board of Directors said in a press release that "Everyone will now be able to order a robot with any appearance — for professional or personal use."

Furthermore, he thinks that their new line of bots will spearhead an entirely fresh market in education, entertainment and service industries, adding "Imagine a replica of Michael Jordan selling basketball uniforms and William Shakespeare reading his own texts in a museum?"

Where else can such a robot be useful? As a consultant, behaving like a regular employee by answering questions, or as an administrator, performing such tasks as booking meetings. They can also work in offices or the government, greeting people and relaying information.

And, of course, if you're in the market for a home robot, you should keep in mind that Robo-Cs can be made to look like any family member. In a way, they can also offer "digital immortality," as Promobot co-founder Oleg Kivokurtsev expressed to CNBC.

Robo-C on CNBC | Promobot

With its AI endowed by 100,000 speech modules, the Promobot's android is able to reproduce the way any person talks by building linguistic models based on the way the speech and other knowledge of the subject. The bot's face has 18 moving parts, giving it the ability to make 600 micro-expressions.

One limitation - it currently can't walk but its upper body has three degrees of free movement.

Promobot is now taking orders for the Robo-C, claiming to already be the biggest manufacturer of autonomous service robots in Northern and Eastern Europe, whose machines can be found in 35 counties in a variety of professions. The android can run you from $20,000 to $50,000, based on various customization options.

Do Androids Dream of Stealing Your Job?

Michio Kaku - Future of Jobs

Is the universe a graveyard? This theory suggests humanity may be alone.

Ever since we've had the technology, we've looked to the stars in search of alien life. It's assumed that we're looking because we want to find other life in the universe, but what if we're looking to make sure there isn't any?

According to the Great Filter theory, Earth might be one of the only planets with intelligent life. And that's a good thing (NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team [STScI/AURA]).
Surprising Science

Here's an equation, and a rather distressing one at that: N = R* × fP × ne × f1 × fi × fc × L. It's the Drake equation, and it describes the number of alien civilizations in our galaxy with whom we might be able to communicate. Its terms correspond to values such as the fraction of stars with planets, the fraction of planets on which life could emerge, the fraction of planets that can support intelligent life, and so on. Using conservative estimates, the minimum result of this equation is 20. There ought to be 20 intelligent alien civilizations in the Milky Way that we can contact and who can contact us. But there aren't any.

Keep reading Show less

The key to better quality education? Make students feel valued.

Building a personal connection with students can counteract some negative side effects of remote learning.

Future of Learning
  • Not being able to engage with students in-person due to the pandemic has presented several new challenges for educators, both technical and social. Digital tools have changed the way we all think about learning, but George Couros argues that more needs to be done to make up for what has been lost during "emergency remote teaching."
  • One interesting way he has seen to bridge that gap and strengthen teacher-student and student-student relationships is through an event called Identity Day. Giving students the opportunity to share something they are passionate about makes them feel more connected and gets them involved in their education.
  • "My hope is that we take these skills and these abilities we're developing through this process and we actually become so much better for our kids when we get back to our face-to-face setting," Couros says. He adds that while no one can predict the future, we can all do our part to adapt to it.
Keep reading Show less

Study details the negative environmental impact of online shopping

Frequent shopping for single items adds to our carbon footprint.

A truck pulls out of a large Walmart regional distribution center on June 6, 2019 in Washington, Utah.

Photo by George Frey/Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new study shows e-commerce sites like Amazon leave larger greenhouse gas footprints than retail stores.
  • Ordering online from retail stores has an even smaller footprint than going to the store yourself.
  • Greening efforts by major e-commerce sites won't curb wasteful consumer habits. Consolidating online orders can make a difference.
Keep reading Show less
Personal Growth

Childhood sleeping problems may signal mental disorders later in life

Chronic irregular sleep in children was associated with psychotic experiences in adolescence, according to a recent study out of the University of Birmingham's School of Psychology.

Scroll down to load more…
Quantcast