Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

Elon Musk sells seats on SpaceX moon mission to Japanese billionaire

The billionaire is also inviting eight artists along with him. It would be the first time a civilian crew has participated in a mission to the moon.

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk (left) shakes hands with Yusaka Maezawa, the Japanese billionaire chosen by the company to fly around the moon. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
  • The billionaire is Yusaku Maezawa, a 42-year-old Japanese entrepreneur who founded the clothing website Zozo.
  • Maezawa, SpaceX's first paying passenger, purchased all the open seats on the first-of-its-kind mission.
  • Maezawa is calling the mission an art project, dubbed #dearMoon.
  • Elon Musk says Maezawa's risky investment in #dearMoon has "done a lot to restore my faith in humanity."

If you're an artist whose work catches the eye of Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa, you might soon receive an extraordinary invitation: a seat on a spacecraft headed for the moon.

At a SpaceX event on Monday night, CEO Elon Musk and Maezawa, an art collector who made a fortune selling albums and clothing, announced plans to send the first civilian crew to space in 2023. The crew is scheduled to blast off from Earth, circle the moon, and return, a trip that's estimated to take four to five days.

The mission will be dangerous, Musk said, adding that Maezawa was "the bravest person" and "the best adventurer." SpaceX plans to launch the crew into space on a new rocket it's developing: the long-awaited BFR, which is also scheduled (aspirationally) to transport humans to Mars in 2022.

Maezawa purchased all the open seats on the first-of-its-kind mission, though the amount he paid is unclear. The billionaire plans to invite up to eight artists to join him on the lunar adventure.

Musk seemed taken with the idea.

"I'll tell you, it's done a lot to restore my faith in humanity," Musk said. "That somebody is willing to do this, take their money and help fund this new project that's risky, might not succeed, it's dangerous. He's like donating seats. These are great things."

​Project #dearMoon

Maezawa, who founded the shopping website Zozotown and is estimated to be worth more than $2 billion, views the upcoming mission as a "revolutionary art project" dubbed #dearMoon.

The project already has a website.

"I did not want to have such a fantastic experience by myself," Maezawa said. "I want to share these experiences and things with as many people as possible. That is why I choose to go to the moon with artists."

Maezawa is no stranger to the art world. As a former drummer in a California rock band, the 42-year-old made headlines in 2017 when he spent $110.5 million on a Basquiat painting, an untitled work roughly depicting a skull, at a Sotheby's auction.

"I decided to go for it," he said about the purchase.

Maezawa said he later wondered, "what if Basquiat had gone to space and seen the moon up close?"

He elaborated that thought in a post on the #dearMoon website.

"If Pablo Picasso had been able to see the moon up-close,
what kind of paintings would he have drawn?
If John Lennon could have seen the curvature of the Earth,
what kind of songs would he have written?
If they had gone to space, how would the world have looked today?"

Maezawa said he's loved the moon ever since he was a kid and that he thinks his art project could contribute toward world peace.

"Why do I want to go to the moon? What do I want to do there? For me this project is very meaningful," Maezawa said. "I thought long and hard about how it would be very valuable to become the first private passenger to go to the moon. At the same time, I thought how I could give to the world and how this could contribute to world peace. This is my lifelong dream."

The entrepreneur plans to personally reach out to a handful of artists, which could include painters, photographers, musicians, film directors, fashion designers, and architects.

"By the way, if you should hear from me please say yes and accept my invitation," he said. "Please don't say no."

At the end of the event, Maezawa offered one of the seats to Musk.

"As far as me going, I'm not sure," Musk said. "Maybe we'll both be on it."

The “new normal” paradox: What COVID-19 has revealed about higher education

Higher education faces challenges that are unlike any other industry. What path will ASU, and universities like ASU, take in a post-COVID world?

Photo: Luis Robayo/AFP via Getty Images
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • Everywhere you turn, the idea that coronavirus has brought on a "new normal" is present and true. But for higher education, COVID-19 exposes a long list of pernicious old problems more than it presents new problems.
  • It was widely known, yet ignored, that digital instruction must be embraced. When combined with traditional, in-person teaching, it can enhance student learning outcomes at scale.
  • COVID-19 has forced institutions to understand that far too many higher education outcomes are determined by a student's family income, and in the context of COVID-19 this means that lower-income students, first-generation students and students of color will be disproportionately afflicted.
Keep reading Show less

4 ways to promote neurogenesis in your brain

How can we promote the creation of new neurons - and why is it so important?

We can promote the development of new neurons well into adulthood - and here's why we should.

Image by vrx on Shutterstock
Mind & Brain
  • Neurogenesis, the birth of neurons from stem cells, happens mostly before we are born - as we are formed in the womb, we are generating most of what we need after birth.
  • After birth, neurogenesis is still possible in two parts of the brain: the olfactory bulb (which is responsible for our sense of smell) and the hippocampus (which is responsible for memory, spatial navigation, and emotional processing).
  • Research from the 1960s proves creating new neurons as adults is possible, and modern-day research explains how (and why) we should promote new neuron growth.
Keep reading Show less

Live on Tuesday | Personal finance in the COVID-19 era

Sallie Krawcheck and Bob Kulhan will be talking money, jobs, and how the pandemic will disproportionally affect women's finances.

How DNA revealed the woolly mammoth's fate – and what it teaches us today

Scientists uncovered the secrets of what drove some of the world's last remaining woolly mammoths to extinction.

Ethan Miller/Getty Images
Surprising Science

Every summer, children on the Alaskan island of St Paul cool down in Lake Hill, a crater lake in an extinct volcano – unaware of the mysteries that lie beneath.

Keep reading Show less
Scroll down to load more…
Quantcast