Paul Allen — Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist — dead at 65

The Seattle tech magnate died from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  • He co-founded Microsoft with Bill Gates in 1975.
  • A major figure in Seattle, he revitalized the city landscape.
  • As of his death, he was the 46th richest person in the world.

Paul Allen, who co-founded Microsoft co-founder along with Bill Gates, has died at the age of 65 in Seattle, Washington.

He died from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a type of cancer. He had announced earlier this month that he was going to go back into treatment for the disease, which he had overcome once before in 2009.

c1.staticflickr.com

Paul Allen with Bill Gates

After starting Microsoft with his childhood friend Bill Gates in 1975, Allen went on to found the Allen Institute for Brain Science, the Institute for Artificial Intelligence, and the Institute for Cell Science. He also was the sole founder of Stratolaunch Systems, an aerospace company, back in 2004. In 2013, he also founded the Allen Institute for the Artificial Intelligence, an AI research lab. A major philanthropist both on the local and national levels, he donated over $2 billion towards education and conservational causes.

upload.wikimedia.org

His sister, Jody, released a statement to the media late Monday:

"While most knew Paul Allen as a technologist and philanthropist, for us he was a much-loved brother and uncle, and an exceptional friend. Paul's family and friends were blessed to experience his wit, warmth, his generosity and deep concern. For all the demands on his schedule, there was always time for family and friends. At this time of loss and grief for us – and so many others – we are profoundly grateful for the care and concern he demonstrated every day."

(Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)

Team Owner Paul Allen of the Seattle Seahawks holds the Lombardi Trophy during ceremonies following the Super Bowl XLVIII Victory Parade at CenturyLink Field on February 5, 2014 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by

Allen also played a huge part in the current tech boom in Seattle, Washington. He almost single-handedly revitalized the South Lake Union district and it has since became one of the most expensive areas for office space in the country. He was also co-owner of the Seattle Seahawks and the Portland Trailblazers, and was one of only two NBA owners (Mark Cuban being the other) who voted against the Supersonic's move to Oklahoma City. He also founded Seattle's Museum of Pop Culture, the Living Computer Museum, and created the Upstart music festival in 2016.

Related Articles Around the Web
From Your Site Articles

    3D printing might save your life one day. It's transforming medicine and health care.

    What can 3D printing do for medicine? The "sky is the limit," says Northwell Health researcher Dr. Todd Goldstein.

    Northwell Health
    Sponsored by Northwell Health
    • Medical professionals are currently using 3D printers to create prosthetics and patient-specific organ models that doctors can use to prepare for surgery.
    • Eventually, scientists hope to print patient-specific organs that can be transplanted safely into the human body.
    • Northwell Health, New York State's largest health care provider, is pioneering 3D printing in medicine in three key ways.
    Keep reading Show less

    Adam Gopnik on the rhinoceros of liberalism vs. the unicorns of everything else

    Torn between absolutism on the left and the right, classical liberalism—with its core values of compassion and incremental progress whereby the once-radical becomes the mainstream—is in need of a good defense. And Adam Gopnik is its lawyer.

    Think Again Podcasts
    • Liberalism as "radical pragmatism"
    • Intersectionality and civic discourse
    • How "a thousand small sanities" tackled drunk driving, normalized gay marriage, and could control gun violence
    Keep reading Show less

    You weren't born ‘to be useful’, Irish president tells young philosophers

    Irish president believes students need philosophy.

    Personal Growth
    • President of Ireland Michael D. Higgins calls for students to be thought of as more than tools made to be useful.
    • Higgins believes that philosophy and history should be a basic requirement forming a core education.
    • The Irish Young Philosopher Awards is one such event that is celebrating this discipline among the youth.
    Keep reading Show less

    Fascism and conspiracy theories: The symptoms of broken communication

    The lost practice of face-to-face communication has made the world a more extreme place.

    Videos
    • The world was saner when we spoke face-to-face, argues John Cameron Mitchell. Not looking someone in the eye when you talk to them raises the potential for miscommunication and conflict.
    • Social media has been an incredible force for activism and human rights, but it's also negatively affected our relationship with the media. We are now bombarded 24/7 with news that either drives us to anger or apathy.
    • Sitting behind a screen makes polarization worse, and polarization is fertile ground for conspiracy theories and fascism, which Cameron describes as irrationally blaming someone else for your problems.
    Keep reading Show less