Paul Allen — Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist — dead at 65

The Seattle tech magnate died from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  • He co-founded Microsoft with Bill Gates in 1975.
  • A major figure in Seattle, he revitalized the city landscape.
  • As of his death, he was the 46th richest person in the world.

Paul Allen, who co-founded Microsoft co-founder along with Bill Gates, has died at the age of 65 in Seattle, Washington.

He died from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a type of cancer. He had announced earlier this month that he was going to go back into treatment for the disease, which he had overcome once before in 2009.

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Paul Allen with Bill Gates

After starting Microsoft with his childhood friend Bill Gates in 1975, Allen went on to found the Allen Institute for Brain Science, the Institute for Artificial Intelligence, and the Institute for Cell Science. He also was the sole founder of Stratolaunch Systems, an aerospace company, back in 2004. In 2013, he also founded the Allen Institute for the Artificial Intelligence, an AI research lab. A major philanthropist both on the local and national levels, he donated over $2 billion towards education and conservational causes.

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His sister, Jody, released a statement to the media late Monday:

"While most knew Paul Allen as a technologist and philanthropist, for us he was a much-loved brother and uncle, and an exceptional friend. Paul's family and friends were blessed to experience his wit, warmth, his generosity and deep concern. For all the demands on his schedule, there was always time for family and friends. At this time of loss and grief for us – and so many others – we are profoundly grateful for the care and concern he demonstrated every day."

(Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)

Team Owner Paul Allen of the Seattle Seahawks holds the Lombardi Trophy during ceremonies following the Super Bowl XLVIII Victory Parade at CenturyLink Field on February 5, 2014 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by

Allen also played a huge part in the current tech boom in Seattle, Washington. He almost single-handedly revitalized the South Lake Union district and it has since became one of the most expensive areas for office space in the country. He was also co-owner of the Seattle Seahawks and the Portland Trailblazers, and was one of only two NBA owners (Mark Cuban being the other) who voted against the Supersonic's move to Oklahoma City. He also founded Seattle's Museum of Pop Culture, the Living Computer Museum, and created the Upstart music festival in 2016.

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