A Tribute in Art: 15 Years On, Explore the Library of Congress’ 9/11 Image Collection

Soon after the 9/11 attacks, the Library of Congress started to gather pictures, photographs, poems and other material for preservation. 

A Tribute in Light
Tribute in Light.

On September 11, 2001, the twin towers of the NYC World Trade Center, and the Pentagon building were attacked by suicide hijackers on three planes. A fourth plane, headed for either the Capitol Building or the White House in D.C., crashed near in Pennsylvania after the passengers fought the hijackers. These tragic events led to the death of almost 3,000 people and injuries for more than 6,000 others, and created a permanent hinge point in the world's history. The official responsibility for these attacks is to the al-Qaeda terrorist organization, of which former senior members have asserted responsibility.


The crash site in New York City known as Ground Zero has become a place of memory. ‘Reflecting Absence’, the incredibly moving twin memorial structures in the plaza mark the great loss incurred and honor the victims and survivors, as does the annual art installation ‘Tribute in Light’, two columns of light that pierce upwards where the twin towers once stood. 9/11 monuments appeared all around the world.

In 2002 the Library of Congress opened the exhibition ‘Witness and Response’, dedicated to the 9/11 events. Soon after the attacks in New York, the library started to gather pictures, photographs and other material for the exposition. These artworks are public domain now, and you can see some of them below. In this collection, you can find child drawings, professional illustrations, documentary photographs, and paintings rendering strong sentiments and heavy emotion.

See the full Library of Congress 9/11 image and art collection on Picryl.

9-11-01, New York City / Andrea Arroyo.



Memorial to Matthew Diaz, a victim of the September 11th terrorist attack on the World Trade Center, New York, N.Y.


WTC 010911 9:15 AM / S. Torre, New York City.


View of Lower Manhattan from the Manhattan Bridge, September 11, 2001.


Sorry, sorry...


God Is In Control

See more images via Picryl here.

A brief history of human dignity

What is human dignity? Here's a primer, told through 200 years of great essays, lectures, and novels.

Credit: Benjavisa Ruangvaree / AdobeStock
Sponsored by the Institute for Humane Studies
  • Human dignity means that each of our lives have an unimpeachable value simply because we are human, and therefore we are deserving of a baseline level of respect.
  • That baseline requires more than the absence of violence, discrimination, and authoritarianism. It means giving individuals the freedom to pursue their own happiness and purpose.
  • We look at incredible writings from the last 200 years that illustrate the push for human dignity in regards to slavery, equality, communism, free speech and education.
Keep reading Show less

Astrophysicists: Gamma-ray jets exceed the speed of light

Scientists find that bursts of gamma rays may exceed the speed of light and cause time-reversibility.

An artist's drawing of a particle jet emanating from a black hole at the center of a blazar.

Credit: DESY, Science Communication Lab (used with permission by Astronomy Picture of the Day, which is co-managed by Robert Nemiroff at Michigan Tech).
Surprising Science
  • Astrophysicists propose that gamma-ray bursts may exceed the speed of light.
  • The superluminal jets may also be responsible for time-reversibility.
  • The finding doesn't go against Einstein's theory because this effect happens in the jet medium not a vacuum.
Keep reading Show less

​'The time is now' for cryptocurrencies, PayPal CEO says

Is Bitcoin akin to 'digital gold'?

Technology & Innovation
  • In October, PayPal announced that it would begin allowing users to buy, sell, and hold cryptocurrencies.
  • Other major fintech companies—Square, Fidelity, SoFi—have also recently begun investing heavily in cryptocurrencies.
  • While prices are volatile, many investors believe cryptocurrencies are a relatively safe bet because blockchain technology will prove itself over the long term.
Keep reading Show less

Study suggests most "dark web" users are not engaging in illicit activities

A new study finds that some people just want privacy.

Photo by Soumil Kumar from Pexels
Technology & Innovation
  • Despite its reputation as a tool for criminals, only a small percentage of Tor users were actually going to the dark web.
  • The rate was higher in free countries and lower in countries with censored internet access.
  • The findings are controversial, and may be limited by their methodology to be general assumptions.
Keep reading Show less
Scroll down to load more…
Quantcast