Many Americans are actually centrists—in theory, anyway

America is polarized, but not as much as you might think.

Photo by Rosemary Ketchum from Pexels
  • A new study finds that Americans aren't as politically polarized as you might think.
  • Respondents generally agreed on the issues of climate change, free speech, and the value of international agreements.
  • The study also found that majorities want a smaller government that provides more services.
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Top-down power: Hierarchies thrive on the internet

The internet was built to resist an Orwellian future. Now it's being weaponized.

  • Research shows hierarchical groups are more likely to use the internet as a platform.
  • This might be counterintuitive, as the original rise of the internet coincided with events like the toppling of top-down structures.
  • Despite the strong belief that the internet is horizontal, these hierarchical systems achieve high levels of online participation.
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Kamala Harris drops out of 2020 presidential race

How will Harris' departure affect the remaining 15 candidates in the Democratic field?

Photo credit: Heidi Gutman / Contributor
  • U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris of California announced Tuesday that she was ending her presidential campaign due to a lack of financial resources.
  • Harris had once been considered one of the top candidates in the Democratic field, but her support has been falling in national polls since the summer.
  • Former Vice President Joe Biden currently leads the Democratic field, with an average of 27 percent support in national polls.
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Talking politics: A Thanksgiving guide to divisive conversations

A guide to keep conflicts from flaring up while you pass your uncle the pumpkin pie.

  • As American families gather around the table for Thanksgiving, there's no guarantee that everyone will have the same views when it comes to politics. This means that there's a lot of potential for conflicts to blow up as we pass one another the pumpkin pie.
  • The best approach is to not shy away from important conversations — yes, talk about politics. However, try to do so in a way that preferences understanding. In other words, instead of trying to change their position — as you beat them over the head with a drumstick — try to understand where they're coming from.
  • Chances are, just by asking them questions you will learn something new that you haven't considered before. That alone, intellectual humility, is something to cherish this holiday season.
Brianna Soukup/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Whether you're a conservative or a liberal, you have most likely come across a political hashtag in an article, a tweet or a personal story shared on Facebook.

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