Is Jordan Peterson's carnivore diet really healthy?

Beef, salt, and water is all the Canadian professor eats. Is that sustainable?

TORONTO, ON - DECEMBER 6 - Profile of Dr. Jordan Peterson. The U of T prof at the centre of a media storm because of his public declaration that he will not use pronouns, such as 'they,' to recognize non-binary genders. (Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
  • Jordan Peterson began eating an all-beef diet after his daughter's health problems cleared up.
  • The human microbiome requires a diversity of nutrients and bacteria, making such a diet questionable in the long-term.
  • Neuroses caused by elimination diets could prove to be unhealthier than the ailments they purportedly cure.
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Culture & Religion

Scientists are zeroing in on where intuition comes from, biologically

There’s a complex biological system behind our intuition.

An event at Stonehenge. Credit: Getty Images.

You know when that “gut feeling" tells you something? Scientists are now starting to zero in on the origin of that feeling. And yes, you should trust it. Previous research has shown that when it comes to decision-making, going with our gut usually makes for a better outcome than if we go on intellect alone.

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Surprising Science

A Diet Lacking in Fiber Wreaks System-Wide Havoc, Scientists Find

It's more than just weight gain—it's chronic inflammation and weak immunity.

Photo: U.S. Air Force, Airman 1st Class Grace Lee.

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Surprising Science

Why You Should 'Rewild' Your Diet to Help Your Microbiome

The community of microorganisms that live inside of your stomach is one of the most important markers of health, physically and psychologically.

 

 

 

I mean, you don't have to boil a rattlesnake but feel free. (Photo: Gerry Penny/AFP/Getty Images)

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Mind & Brain

Family Conflict in Childhood May Affect Your Immune System as an Adult

The study had some interesting findings for the adult children of separated parents who were civil. 

 

A young girl who is scared. Flikr.

More and more, we’re learning about the mind-body connection and how it affects health. We’re also realizing that epigenetic changes from our parents and the emotional climate in which they lived, can plant negative seeds in us. In our own lives, medical researchers in the last several decades have figured out that chronically feeling negative emotions can weaken our immune system, while long-term positive ones boost it.

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Personal Growth