Map shows homicide hotspots in medieval London

Interactive map reveals the horror — and the patterns — of murder in 14th-century London.

  • This map shows the 142 murders that were committed in London from 1300 to 1340.
  • Each clickable pin reveals the grisly details as recorded in contemporary coroner's reports.
  • Then as now, stabbing was the main method of killing in London — but the murder rate was three times higher.
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How to split the USA into two countries: Red and Blue

Progressive America would be half as big, but twice as populated as its conservative twin.

Image: Dicken Schrader
  • America's two political tribes have consolidated into 'red' and 'blue' nations, with seemingly irreconcilable differences.
  • Perhaps the best way to stop the infighting is to go for a divorce and give the two nations a country each
  • Based on the UN's partition plan for Israel/Palestine, this proposal provides territorial contiguity and sea access to both 'red' and 'blue' America
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Colorado is a rectangle? Think again.

The Centennial State has 697 sides‚ not four.

  • Colorado looks like a rectangle. It isn't.
  • The Centennial State has not four, but 697 sides. That makes it a hexahectaenneacontakaiheptagon.
  • Does that make Wyoming the only real rectangular state? Well, about that…
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Map of political book sales shows a polarized nation

The states with golden stars on them are extra intriguing.

Barnes & Noble
  • Barnes & Noble reported a 57% increase in political book sales compared to 2017.
  • The top three best-selling political books of 2018 have been mostly critical of President Donald Trump, though each state varies in which political books it buys most.
  • Despite the boost in sales, Barnes & Noble could put itself up for sale in the near future.
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Finally, a world map that's all about oceans

The Spilhaus Projection may be more than 75 years old, but it has never been more relevant than today.

  • Athelstan Spilhaus designed an oceanic thermometer to fight the Nazis, and the weather balloon that got mistaken for a UFO in Roswell.
  • In 1942, he produced a world map with a unique perspective, presenting the world's oceans as one body of water.
  • The Spilhaus Projection could be just what the oceans need to get the attention their problems deserve.
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