Hope Isn’t Blind: It’s a Way to Build Trust and Manage Anxiety

Some anxieties are essential, and for millennia they kept our ancestors alive. But there's another type of anxiety that we can actually do away with—and it's defeated via hope.

In this refreshing take on the utility of hope, Princeton research scholar Victoria McGeer explains that there's a difference between blind hope and practical hope. The latter means taking a clear-eyed view of potential disappointment, knowing that there may be failure, and then putting your anxieties offline by trusting in the elements that are beyond your control. Trust is a critical feature of human social life, and we're often obligated to trust in uncertain circumstances: trust your kids, trust that stranger, trust your neighbor. Hope, when done properly, can fortify trust, reduce anxiety, and actually give you the tools to cope with disappointment. This video was filmed as part of the Los Angeles Hope Festival, a collaboration between Big Think and Hope & Optimism.

Sponsored

Cornel West: Hope Is an Action We Can All Take

Cornel West talks about everyday poets, being the best of the human species, hope, what wokeness really means, and revolution.

Institutions—governmental, religious, financial, even revolution itself—have a way of turning stale and sour. "Thank God for the history of the heretics and the blasphemers. That's my crowd," says Dr. Cornel West. Quoting from some of history and literature's greatest thinkers and doers, West presents a poetic lecture on the role of hope in America's past and its future, and how to make your voice matter.

Keep reading Show less
Sponsored

From AI to Mass Shootings, Neuroscience Is the Future of Problem Solving

David Eagleman, neuroscientist and host of 'The Brain' on PBS, will speak at the Los Angeles Hope Festival on Sunday, May 21. The event is free but seats are limited.

Neuroscientst David Eagleman.

David Eagleman, neuroscientist and host of 'The Brain' on PBS, will speak at the Los Angeles Hope Festival on Sunday, May 21. The event is free but seats are limited. RSVP here.

Keep reading Show less
Sponsored